Latest Articles

BOOK REVIEW: Playing through the pain: Ken Caminiti and the Steroids Confession That Changed Baseball Forever

December 15th, 2023|Contemporary Sports Issues, Sports Management|

Authors: Barrett Snyder

West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA

Corresponding Author:

Barrett Snyder
PO Box 128
West Chester, PA 484-889-7321
jbarrettsnyder@veriszon.net

Barrett Snyder is a WCUPA graduate student pursuing a master’s degree in Exercise Science with a specialization in Sports Psychology

BOOK REVIEW: Playing through the pain: Ken Caminiti and the Steroids Confession That Changed Baseball Forever

Good, D. (2022). Playing through the pain: Ken Caminiti and the Steroids Confession That Changed Baseball Forever. Abrams Press.

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Assessing the Impact of Gender and Expertise in Athletic Product Endorsement in China

December 8th, 2023|Research, Sports Management|

Authors: Jiayao Chee Qi1, Marshall J. Magnusen2, Jun Woo Kim3, and Jeffrey C. Petersen2

1Department of Sport and Entertainment Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA
2Department of Educational Leadership, Baylor University, Waco, TX, USA
3School of Global Business, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA, USA

Corresponding Author:

Marshall J. Magnusen, PhD
Marrs McLean Science
One Bear Place #97312
Waco, TX 76798
Marshall_Magnusen@baylor.edu
254-710-4019

Jiayao Chee Qi, MSEd, is a doctoral candidate at the University of South Carolina. His advisor is Dr. Sam Todd, the associate dean for faculty, operations, and international partnerships. His current research interests focus on sport organization behavior, realistic job previews, and personnel selection.

Marshall J. Magnusen, PhD, is an associate professor of sport management at Baylor University. Magnusen’s research interests include leadership, recruiting and personnel selection, and wellbeing.
Jun Woo Kim, PhD, is an associate professor of sport management at Arcadia University. His research interests are in the areas of sport consumer behavior, marketing, and sports analytics.
Jeffrey C. Petersen, PhD, is a professor of sport management at Baylor University. He has research interests in the areas of sport consumer behavior as well as facility and event management.

Assessing the Impact of Gender and Expertise in Athletic Product Endorsement in China

ABSTRACT

Product-endorser relationships are critical to the success of marketing campaigns involving the sponsorship of an individual to promote a product or service. The significance of such relationships can be understood in part through the “match-up hypothesis.” This theory suggests endorsers are more effective when “fit” is stronger between a product and the endorser of the product. In this study, Chinese consumers’ perceptions of gender-sport fit, expertise, and endorser-product fit were evaluated. Images of two sets of athletes participating in different sports, with one being mixed martial arts (MMA) and the other one being gymnastics, were compared in a two-part study by 649 sport consumers from Shanghai, China. In Study 1, a 2 (male athlete and female athlete) × 2 (MMA and gymnastics) model compared Chinese consumers’ perceptions of gender-sport fit on endorser-product fit. In Study 2, a 2 (gender-sport fit: high and low) × 2 (expertise: highly skilled and less skilled) model evaluated whether consumers’ perceptions of endorser-product fit were more strongly influenced by athlete gender-sport fit or sport expertise. Gender-sport fit was shown to outperform expertise. Though expertise is important, an endorsement lacking sufficient gender-sport fit may not maximize the effectiveness of the endorsement relationship.


Key Words: consumer behavior; culture; endorsers; international; marketing; MMA; sponsorship; sport management

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A cross-sectional study—examine the relationship between work interference with family conflict and burnout among athletic trainers

December 1st, 2023|Sports Medicine|

Authors: Stephanie M Singe, Julio Hernandez, Alexandrya Cairns

Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, USA

Corresponding Author:

Stephanie M. Singe, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Director, Teaching and Learning
Department of Kinesiology
University of Connecticut
2095 Hillside Road, U-1110, Storrs, CT 06269-1110
860-608-4184
@StephanieSinge
stephanie.m.singe@uconn.edu

Stephanie M. Singe is an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology. Her research focus is on work-life balance and other factors that influence the job satisfaction and quality of life of an athletic trainer. She is lead author of the position statement on Facilitating Work-Life Balance in Athletic Training Practice Settings.

Julio Hernandez, BS is a graduate student at the University of Connecticut, studying physical therapy. He earned his BS in Exercise Science and completed this project as part of his senior capstone project.

Alexandrya H Cairns is a second year PhD student in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Connecticut. Her research interests include work-life balance among athletic trainers, and more specifically perceptions of patient care and clinician well-being.

A Cross-sectional Study—Examine the Relationship Between Work Interference with Family Conflict and Burnout Among Athletic Trainers

ABSTRACT
Objective: Work-family conflict and burnout are reported among college athletic trainers, and a recent systematic review found work-family conflict has been found to be a contributor to burnout. Much, however, is to be explored on the relationship between the two constructs. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the relationships between burnout, work-family conflict, and engagement in self-care practices.
Methods: We had 984 (370 men, 605 women, 9 did not disclose) college athletic trainers participate in our survey. Of those 984, 564 were employed in the NCAA Division I setting, 187 in the NCAA Division II setting, and 233 in the NCAA Division III setting.
Data analyzed included basic demographic information, the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, a Work-Family Conflict Scale, and 4 questions pertaining to self-care.
Results: Athletic trainers scored a mean of 39.51 ± 8.88 on the work and family conflict scale and a moderate burnout score of 61.59 ± 12.55. A moderate negative correlation resulted between the work to family subscale, and the work-related subscale, rs (984)= -.535, p<.001. A significant regression equation was present, F(1, 982)= 424.93, p<.001, with an R2 of .302. A Kruskal-Wallis H test revealed statistically significant differences (𝒳2[2]= 212.89, p<.001) between these three groups (always/often, sometimes, seldom/never) regarding feeling fatigued at work within the CBI, and significant differences (𝒳2[2]=91.21, p<.001) between the same groups on the WFC. A Kruskal-Wallis H test revealed a statistically significant difference between groups regarding availability to engage in self-care practices on both the CBI (𝒳2[2]=212.89, p<.001), and the WFC (𝒳2[2]=110.66, p<.001).
Conclusions: Athletic trainers who experienced higher levels of work interference with family conflict reported higher levels of personal and work-related burnout. Family interference with work conflict was not found to be associated with higher levels of personal burnout. Fatigue was associated with experiences of burnout but not work family conflict. Engagement in self-care practices was shown to help manage burnout, but wasn’t shown to lower levels of work family conflict.

Key words: workplace issues, stress, role strain, self-care, burnout

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Coincidence anticipation timing requirements across different stimulus speeds in various sports: A pilot study

November 17th, 2023|Research, Sports Studies|

Authors: Haneol Kim

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI, 54601, USA

Haneol Kim
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
124 Mitchell Hall, La Crosse, WI 54601
Cell: 765-586-5878
Email: hkim2@uwlax.edu

Haneol Kim is a faculty member in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. His areas of research interest include biomechanics, motor control and learning in sports.

Coincidence anticipation timing requirements across different stimulus speeds in various sports: A pilot study

ABSTRACT

The ability of coincidence anticipation timing is directly related to athletic performance in sports, and anticipation timing requirements vary according to the sports type. This case study aimed to investigate the coincidence anticipation timing of male university athletes in various sports across different stimulus speeds such as slow (3 mph), moderate (6 mph), and fast (9 mph). Nineteen university athletes from soccer (n = 5), tennis (n = 7), and volleyball (n = 7) participated voluntarily in this study and were compared to non-athletes (n = 6). All participants pressed the button when the light stimulus arrived at the target location of a Bassin anticipation timer to assess anticipation timing accuracy in terms of constant, absolute, and variable errors. A speed effect in constant error (p < 0.001) and a group by speed interaction in variable error (p = 0.044) were found. However, no significant difference was found in absolute error. In conclusion, coincidence anticipation timing requirements are different across sports types. Racket sports such as tennis might be more beneficial to improving anticipation timing skills than other sports or non-athletes.

Keywords: sports performance, anticipation timing accuracy, athletes, male

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Coach experiences during a pandemic: Navigating change in a challenging environment

November 10th, 2023|Research, Sport Education|

Authors: Todd Layne1, Kelly Simonton2, Jamie Brunsdon1, & Marko Pavlovic1

1College of Health Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA
2Division of Kinesiology and Health, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA

Corresponding Author:

Todd Layne, PhD
495 Zach Curlin St.
Memphis, TN, 38152
telayne@memphis.edu
901-481-8081

Todd Layne, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Physical Education Teacher Education at the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN. His research program examines the use of the sport education model as well as coaching effectiveness.

Kelly Simonton, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Physical Education Teacher Education at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, WY. His research focus revolves around achievement motivation in physical education and physical activity, specifically as it relates to student and teacher emotions and their motivational effects.

Jamie Brunsdon, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Physical Education Teacher Education at the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN. Dr. Brunsdon’s research interests are largely focused on teacher/faculty socialization and applied ethics.

Coach experiences during a pandemic: Navigating change in a challenging environment

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to understand coaches’ response via their day-to-day experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic from the lens of coaching during the COVID-19 national health pandemic. This study utilized qualitative analysis via two zoom-call recorded interviews. A total of nine current head coaches (middle and high school) of teams that participated in the 2021 spring season were involved. Data were analyzed using standard interpretive techniques. Final analysis resulted in general themes that reflected perceptions of the coaches. Themes included (a) new purpose, (b) extra preparation, (c) mixed emotions, (d) creating connections during isolation, and (e) finding relief in helping hands. Coaches are faced with challenges each season. With the recent COVID-19 pandemic, coaches experienced difficulties never seen before. Coaches learned to adapt and respond to situations with a goal of togetherness as a team and competing again. These experiences will prepare coaches for future unexpected changes that can occur within a typical sport season.

Key words: coach, emotion, COVID-19 pandemic

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