About U.S. Sports Academy

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far U.S. Sports Academy has created 838 blog entries.

A phenomenological exploration of constraints for varsity football student-athletes with a sport-related concussion

Authors: Wahid Hamidi1, Yusuf Hamidi2, and George Karlis1  

1Department of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 125 University pvt., Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1N 1A2
2Department of Nursing, University of Ottawa 125, University pvt., Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1N 1A2

Corresponding Author:
Wahid Hamidi, Ph.D. Candidate
125 University pvt.
Ottawa, ON, Canada
K1N 1A2
Email: whami024@uottawa.ca
Phone: 613-558-8279

Wahid Hamidi is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa, Canada. His area or research focuses on initiating and maintaining physical activity and exercise behavior, and injury prevention and concussion management in the academic and athletic settings for varsity student-athletes. He is a recipient of the University of Ottawa Admission Scholarship.

Yusuf Hamidi is a Master of Science student in the School of Nursing at the University of Ottawa, Canada. His area of research focuses on problem-solving approaches to learning barriers for undergraduate students using simulated-based learning. He is a recipient of the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program award.

George Karlis is a Full Professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa, Canada. His area of research focuses on leisure, society, recreation, sport, and community development.

A phenomenological exploration of constraints for varsity football student-athletes with a sport-related concussion

ABSTRACT

Sports-related concussions are an emergent public health concern due to an increase in mortality and morbidity incident rates. The purpose of this study is to identify constraints in academic and athletic settings for varsity football student-athletes with a sport-related concussion. Twelve varsity football student-athletes from one institution who were diagnosed with a sport-related concussion took part in semi-structured interviews. This study used the social ecological model to identify intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental factors. Results suggested that varsity football student-athletes with a sport-related concussion experienced several constraining social ecological factors in the academic and athletic settings. Intrapersonal constraints related to loss of motivation, loss of social identification, stress, anxiety and depression, injury-specific issues, and internal pressure to return. Interpersonal constraints related to insufficient social support, lack of awareness and guidance on concussion knowledge, external pressure to return, and lack of academic support post-concussion. Environmental constraints related to return-to-play and return-to-learn protocols. Findings suggested that there remains a need to address constraining factors in the academic and athletic settings for varsity football student-athletes with a sport-related concussion.

(more…)
2021-05-12T09:35:00-05:00May 14th, 2021|Research, Sports Studies and Sports Psychology|Comments Off on A phenomenological exploration of constraints for varsity football student-athletes with a sport-related concussion

Self-efficacy in college athletics: An exploratory study

Authors: Martha G. Dettl-Rivera1, Diane L. Gill2, Erin Reifsteck2

1Physical Education, Sport and Human Performance Department, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC, USA
2Department of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA

Corresponding Author:
Martha G. Dettl-Rivera, EdD, SCAT, ATC
116A West Center
Rock Hill, SC 29732
dettlriveram@winthrop.edu
215-264-6090

Martha G. Dettl-Rivera is an assistant professor of Athletic Training at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC. Her research interest includes mental health in college athletics.

Diane L. Gill is a professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in Greensboro, NC. Her research interests include social psychology and physical activity.

Erin Reifsteck is an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in Greensboro, NC. Her current research focuses on promoting lifelong physical activity and health among athletes.

Self-efficacy in college athletics: An exploratory study

ABSTRACT

This research examined the self-efficacy scores of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) college athletic trainers from Division I and Division III Southeastern universities. Implementing mental health best practices for college athletic trainers to recognize and to refer student-athletes with mental health issues and disorders have been top priorities of the NCAA and National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA). Purpose: This research explored the influence of the USA Mental Health First Aid (MHFA-USA) course of NCAA college athletic trainers’ self-efficacy levels of college student-athletes’ mental health referrals. Methods: A survey approach was adopted to measure participant (n=8) confidence levels of referring student-athletes to qualified mental health care practitioners utilizing a valid self-efficacy scale. Results: Overall, there was improvement in self-efficacy scores immediately following the course as well as consistent improvement at the one-month follow-up survey. Conclusions: There has been no current research on mental health formal trainings of practicing athletic trainers at the NCAA level. Findings from this study were promising as NCAA college athletic trainers’ self-efficacy improved following completion of the MHFA-USA course. Application in Sports: This study offers exploratory insight of the potential training of NCAA college athletic trainers to appropriately and to confidently refer student-athletes to appropriate care. Findings suggest mental health training programs focused on improvement of confidence levels of NCAA college athletic trainers should be considered.

(more…)
2021-04-29T11:15:55-05:00April 30th, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Self-efficacy in college athletics: An exploratory study

The relationship between hip extensor strength and contralateral and ipsilateral hip flexor muscle length in healthy men and women

Authors: Ashley Calvillo1, Guillermo Escalante2, and Morey J. Kolber3

1Los Angeles Sunset Department of Physical Therapy, Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA, USA
2Department of Kinesiology, California State University- San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, USA
3Department of Physical Therapy, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA

Corresponding Author:
Guillermo Escalante, DSc, MBA, ATC, CSCS*D, CISSN
California State University- San Bernardino
Department of Kinesiology
5500 University Parkway
San Bernardino, CA 92407
(909) 537-7236
(909) 537-7085 fax
gescalan@csusb.edu

Ashley Calvillo, PT, DPT, OCS is a physical therapist at Kaiser Permanente- Sunset in Los Angeles where she focuses on treatment of orthopedic injuries. Her research interests are in the areas of orthopedic physical therapy.

Guillermo Escalante, DSc, MBA, ATC, CSCS*D, CISSN is a Dean Fellow for the College of Natural Sciences and an Associate Professor of Kinesiology at California State University- San Bernardino in San Bernardino, CA. His research interests focus on body composition, improving muscle strength/hypertrophy/sports performance, sports injury prevention/rehabilitation, and sports nutrition.  

Morey J. Kolber, PT, PhD, OCS, CSCS*D is a professor of physical therapy at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, FL. His research interests are in orthopedics, diagnostic imaging, and regenerative medicine.

The relationship between hip extensor strength and contralateral and ipsilateral hip flexor muscle length in healthy men and women

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the relationship between hip extensor (HE) strength to contralateral and ipsilateral hip flexor muscle length. Bilateral hip extension range of motion (ROM) was evaluated using the modified Thomas test using a hand-held goniometer in seventeen males (26 ± 7 yrs, 174.9 ± 6.72 cm, 79.4 ± 7.9 kg) and twenty-seven females (24 ± 2 yrs, 162.7 ± 6.40 cm, 67.2 ± 13.1 kg).  Participants were classified as: a) restricted hip flexors (hip extension ROM > 6° from horizontal), b) neither restricted nor normal hip flexors (hip extension ROM between 0° to 6° from horizontal), and c) normal hip flexors (hip extension ROM < 0° from horizontal). Peak isometric HE force was obtained via a Biodex dynamometer where maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was determined. Correlations were used to determine the relationship between flexor length to contralateral and ipsilateral HE relative strength. A One-way ANOVA was used to examine HE relative strength in relation to hip flexor length classified as restricted vs neither vs normal. There were no correlations between right hip flexor length and contralateral HE strength (r = -0.228, p = 0.137), right hip flexor length and ipsilateral HE strength (r = -0.241, p = 0.115), left hip flexor length and contralateral HE strength (r = -0.193, p = 0.210), and left hip flexor length and ipsilateral HE strength (r = -0.111, p = 0.472). The One-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences between the groups for the most restricted hip flexor and contralateral HE relative strength (p = 0.179) nor for the most restricted hip flexor and ipsilateral HE relative strength (p = 0.670). No significant relationships were found between HE strength and contralateral or ipsilateral hip flexor length. Although it is commonly suggested that practitioners address hip flexor length to assist with improving gluteal muscle strength, the results of this study do not validate this clinical practice. Despite the results indicating no correlations, practitioners are encouraged to address these impairments from both a functional and performance based perspective.

(more…)
2021-04-02T08:47:51-05:00April 9th, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on The relationship between hip extensor strength and contralateral and ipsilateral hip flexor muscle length in healthy men and women

Emotional Intelligence as a predictor of success in personal training

Authors: Melinda B. Abbott1, Kathleen A. O’Connell2

1Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
2Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

Corresponding Author:
Melinda B. Abbott, Ed.D
4 Bogardus Place, 4D
New York, NY 10040
mba2122@tc.columbia.edu
917-854-2818

Melinda Abbott, EdD, works in Ambulatory Operations at NYU Langone Health. She is an Adjunct faculty member in the Health Sciences Department at Mercy College. Additionally, she works as a Health Educator, yoga instructor and personal trainer via her website, where she consults private clients about health education and nutrition counseling.

Kathleen A. O’Connell, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Director of the Nursing Education Program at Teachers College, Columbia University, is a nurse-psychologist who studies health behavior.  

Emotional Intelligence as a predictor of success in personal training

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Little is known about the characteristics that contribute to success in personal training. It was hypothesized that emotional intelligence is a predictor of success. Because no instruments were available to address this hypothesis, instruments to measure emotional intelligence in personal trainers and success in personal trainers were developed for this study. Methods: A survey that included 95 items was completed by 225 certified personal trainers. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to determine which variables exhibited the most influence on success. Results: Emotional intelligence levels increased the variance accounted for by 48 percentage points over and above variables of weekly productivity, the type of facility the trainer is affiliated with, and years of employment, which accounted for less than 20% of total success (adjusted R squared = 0.665). Conclusions: Emotional intelligence levels appear to be an important contribution towards success as a personal trainer. Further research is recommended to inform the profession of personal training regarding what skills may contribute towards trainer success. Applications in Sport: As obesity levels remain a health concern, personal trainers will continue to be an asset towards assisting their clients in their pursuit of health and fitness goals.

(more…)
2021-04-02T08:42:47-05:00April 2nd, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Emotional Intelligence as a predictor of success in personal training

The Mission Value of Collegiate Esports

Authors: Jill Murray, PhD1, Erica Barone Pricce, PhD2, and Stephanie Decker MBA3

1President and Chief Innovation Officer, Lackawanna College, Scranton, PA, USA
2Provost, Lackawanna College, Scranton, PA, USA
3Office of Social and Economic Impact, Lackawanna College, Scranton, PA, USA

Corresponding Author:
Stephanie Decker, MBA, CHE
501 Vine Street
Scranton, Pa 18509
deckers@lackawanna.edu
570-504-7945

Jill Murray is the President and Chief Innovation Officer at the Lackawanna College in Scranton, PA. Her research interests focus on innovation, strategic planning and leadership.

Erica Barone Pricci, PhD is the Provost at Lackawanna College in Scranton, PA.  Erica’s areas of research interest include supporting at risk college students, program development and building educational pathways. 

Stephanie Decker, MBA is the Associate Vice President of Social and Economic impact at Lackawanna College, Scranton, PA. Her research interests are in the areas of small business success factors, creating job pipelines for disadvantaged students, and using innovation to reduce the student loan burden in the United States.

(more…)
2021-03-25T15:21:45-05:00March 26th, 2021|Commentary|Comments Off on The Mission Value of Collegiate Esports
Go to Top