Twice as Tough: Perspectives of High School Athletic Directors Serving as Assistant Principals

1Department of Educational Leadership, Ball State University

Corresponding Author:
Nicholas P. Elam, Ph.D.
Department of Educational Leadership, Ball State University
Teachers College 909
Muncie, IN 47306
npelam@bsu.edu

Nicholas P. Elam, Ph.D is an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership at Ball State University. His research focuses on athletics leadership in school settings.

Twice as Tough: Perspectives of High School Athletic Directors Serving as Assistant Principals

ABSTRACT

Purpose – Many school districts are seeking to consolidate their administrative teams. For better or worse, some school districts are doing so by combining the titles of High School Assistant Principal (AP) and High School Athletic Director (AD), placing the demands of both roles on one individual. Extensive research exists regarding the nature of the assistant principal role, and extensive research exists regarding the nature of the athletic director role. However, little to no research exists regarding the unique nature of the dual AP/AD role. This qualitative study addresses this gap in research.

Methods – Sixteen AP/ADs from one Midwestern state participated in this study, offering candid and rich responses during a one-on-one interview lasting approximately one hour. Interview transcripts were analyzed through line-by-line open coding, followed by axial coding.

Results – From these interviews emerged six major themes: Assistant Principal/Athletic Director dual titles exist primarily as a cost-saving measure; Some see themselves as an Assistant Principal-first, others see themselves as an Athletic Director-first; Those who see themselves as an Assistant Principal-first have lower morale than those who see themselves as an Athletic Director-first; Few formal programs are in place to proactively promote academic achievement among student-athletes; AP/ADs rely heavily on their support network to navigate the mental toll and extensive time commitment; Misconceptions exist about the roles and responsibilities of assistant principals and athletic directors.

Conclusions/Applications – Findings of this study imply that AP/ADs need a new type of support, for mental health and practical purposes, that is specifically tailored and formatted for AP/ADs.

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2022-09-26T15:04:07-05:00September 21st, 2022|Leadership|Comments Off on Twice as Tough: Perspectives of High School Athletic Directors Serving as Assistant Principals

Engaging Undergraduate Student-Athletes in Research and Publication Opportunities

Authors: Erin B. Jensen1, Desislava Yordanova, Lauren Denhard, Kira Zazzi, Jose Mejia, Timothy Shar, Julia Iseman, Tucker Hoeniges, and Madison Mitchell

1Department of English, Belmont Abbey College, Belmont, NC, USA

Corresponding Author:
Erin B. Jensen, PhD
100 Belmont-Mount Holly Road
Belmont, NC, 28210
erinjensen@bac.edu

Erin B. Jensen, PhD, is an Associate Professor of English at Belmont Abbey College in Belmont, NC.

Desislava Yordanova majored in biology and was on the Acro-tumbling team. She is in a Masters in Public Health program.

Lauren Denhard is majoring in criminal justice and minoring in writing. She is a member of the golf team.

Kira Zazzi is a marketing major and was on the cycling team.

Jose Meji is majoring in economics and finance and was on the golf team.

Timothy Shar is majoring in math and was on the soccer team.

Julia Iseman was a psychology major and a member of the triathlon team, cross-country team, and track and field team. She plans to pursue a Masters in Psychology

Tucker Hoeniges is majoring in business and is a member of the cycling team.

Madison Mitchell majored in marketing and was a member of the field hockey team.

Engaging Undergraduate Student-Athletes in Research and Publication Opportunities

ABSTRACT

Universities and colleges are increasing opportunities for undergraduate research and publication for students; less studied is how to engage and encourage student-athletes to participate in such activities. Student-athletes often do not engage in undergraduate research activities due to time constraints of practicing and competing on their respective athletic teams and their full-time enrollment in college classes. This case study focuses on the experiences of eight undergraduate student-athletes and their faculty mentor who decide to co-author an article (this specific one) about their experiences in pursuing undergraduate research and publication. Through the experience of writing this article, we argue that undergraduate student-athletes can succeed in undergraduate research and publication, but are more successful when working with a mentor. We provide suggestions for what worked best for us to be able to be involved in this project. We also discuss the benefits to our own academic achievements and our increased confidence in our writing and research skills.  

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2022-09-26T14:54:27-05:00September 9th, 2022|Leadership, Research, Sports Studies and Sports Psychology|Comments Off on Engaging Undergraduate Student-Athletes in Research and Publication Opportunities

How NCAA Division I, II, and III Men’s College Basketball Coaches Perceive Themselves as Leaders

Authors: Matthew Raidbard

Corresponding Author:
Matthew Raidbard, Ed.D.
9501 South King Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60628
mraidbard@gmail.com
847-826-2827

Matthew Raidbard has been a men’s college basketball coach for the past twelve years. He has also served for the past three years as a senior level college athletics administrator. His research focus is determining the best leadership style and leadership behaviors for athletic coaches to practice in order for them to be successful.

College Basketball Coach Leadership Perception: A Review and Recommendations

ABSTRACT

A quantitative design was used by this study to determine how Division I, II, and III men’s college basketball head coaches perceive themselves as leaders. A leadership survey was emailed to all Division I, II, and III men’s college basketball head coaches, and the head coaches who chose to complete the leadership survey comprised the population for this study. The head coaches who met the study’s definition of a successful head coach were sorted into a separate sub-population. Data analysis was conducted on the data collected from the completed leadership surveys and the best leadership style and leadership behaviors for athletic coaches to practice were determined based on the head coaches’ responses. This study determined that transformational leadership was the best leadership style for athletic coaches to practice when the autocratic leadership behavior that athletic coaches should centralize their authority and be the sole decision-makers was also practiced. Additional analysis conducted on the data determined that there was a small degree of correlation between the perceived and actual leadership styles of the head coaches who completed the leadership survey, which indicated that athletic coaches could benefit from leadership training that taught them the best leadership style and leadership behaviors to practice, and how to practice them.

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2019-03-22T11:22:33-05:00March 22nd, 2019|Leadership|Comments Off on How NCAA Division I, II, and III Men’s College Basketball Coaches Perceive Themselves as Leaders

Preferred leadership Styles of Student Athletes in a Midwest NAIA Conference

Authors: Todd D. Pitts, Ed. D, Gerald Nyambane, Ph.D., Stephen L. Butler Ed.D.

Corresponding Author:
Todd D. Pitts, Ed.D
6191 Kraft Avenue
Grand Rapids, Michigan 49512
tpitts@davenport.edu
616-554-4716

Todd D. Pitts is an Associate Professor of Sports Management at Davenport University in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He also serves as the university’s Faculty Athletic Representative (FAR) to the NCAA.

Preferred Leadership Styles of Student-Athletes in a Midwest NAIA Conference

ABSTRACT
This study examined the leadership preferences of student-athletes competing in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) conference located in the Midwest region of the United States. Using Chelladurai’s Leadership Scale for Sports (LSS) instrument, quantitative data were collected from student-athletes (N = 758) representing 9 universities competing in the conference. All 5 dimensions of leadership behavior were compared across student-athletes’ gender, coaches’ gender, task dependence nature of the sport played, and whether or not the student-athlete’s institution identifies itself as faith-based, or non-faith-based. The results from 2 sample t-tests indicated that training and instruction and positive feedback were the most preferred leadership dimensions. The results also confirmed findings from previous studies that autocratic behavior is the least preferred leadership dimension. In addition, the democratic behavior leadership dimension was preferred more by student-athletes participating in independent sports than student-athletes in team sports; corroborating findings in recent studies. (more…)

2018-11-21T11:37:24-06:00December 27th, 2018|Leadership, Research|Comments Off on Preferred leadership Styles of Student Athletes in a Midwest NAIA Conference

TRANSFORM YOURSELF: Literature-based review of transformational leadership behaviors and practical applications for high school athletic administrators

Author: Chris Hobbs

Corresponding Author:
Chris Hobbs, CMAA, Ed.S.
120 Nottingham Rd
Royal Palm Beach, FL. 33411
coachchrishobbs@gmail.com
@coachchrishobbs
732.325.4772

Chris Hobbs is the Director of Athletics and Head Boys’ Basketball Coach at The King’s Academy in West Palm Beach, Florida. He holds a masters’ degree from the United States Sports Academy in Sport Coaching, a specialist degree in educational leadership from Liberty University, and is a certified master athletic administrator (CMAA) of the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association.

TRANSFORM YOURSELF: Literature-based review of transformational leadership behaviors transformational leadership behaviors and practical applications for high school athletic administrators

ABSTRACT
Transformational leadership has risen to the top of many lists as the preferred leadership practice for organizations. Information on its effectiveness for an interscholastic athletic administrator in a high school is difficult to find. High school athletic departments continue to grow with nearly 8 million student-athletes participating in them (NFHS, 2017). The responsibilities of the leaders overseeing those departments is broadening by the day. Literature is beginning to provide insights into how transformational leadership is the preferred method for even athletic administrators. Leaders that are clear about their purpose, time, communication, and people are increasing organizational and individual effectiveness in athletic departments. Athletic administrators have a platform to transform entire communities through educational based athletics but first they must become informed on how to transform themselves into transformational leaders.
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2018-04-23T10:27:30-05:00May 3rd, 2018|Commentary, Leadership, Sports Management|Comments Off on TRANSFORM YOURSELF: Literature-based review of transformational leadership behaviors and practical applications for high school athletic administrators
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