Latest Articles

Relationships Among Muscle Characteristics and Rowing Performance in Collegiate Crew Members

January 14th, 2022|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Omid Nabavizadeh1 and Ashley A. Herda, PhD2

1Geriatric Medicine Department, University of Colorado-School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States; https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8921-451X
2Department of Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences, University of Kansas-Edwards Campus, Overland Park, Kansas, United States; https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6184-2055

Corresponding Author:
Ashley A. Herda, Ph.D., CSCS*D
Assistant Professor
University of Kansas-Edwards Campus
Department of Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences
12604 Quivira Road, Overland Park, KS 66213
BEST 350X
Phone: (913) 897-8618
E-Mail: a.herda@ku.edu
https://hses.ku.edu/people/ashley-herda

Omid Nabavizadeh is a professional research assistant at the University of Colorado.

Ashley A. Herda, Ph.D. is an assistant professor for the exercise science program at the University of Kansas Edwards Campus in Overland Park. Dr. Herda completed her Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science and Health Promotion (2006) from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida. She continued her education at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma where she earned her Master of Science in Exercise Physiology (2008) under the mentorship of Jeff Stout and Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Physiology (2011) under the mentorship of Dr. Joel Cramer. Dr. Herda’s research interests include the investigation of the effects of nutritional supplements and/or exercise interventions on performance and body composition in men and women across the lifespan.

Relationships Among Muscle Characteristics and Rowing Performance in Collegiate Crew Members

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among measurements of muscle quality and rowing performance in college-aged club rowers. Methods: Ten men and women (mean ± SD: age: 22.1 ± 4.0 years; ht: 180.5 ± 8.3 cm; wt: 79.0 ± 13.5 kg) volunteered to participate in this study. Ultrasound images were collected at 50% thigh length in a transverse plane to quantify muscle size. The sum cross-sectional area (mCSA) of these muscles was reported. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was conducted to predict fat-free mass (FFM) and estimate total leg lean mass. One-repetition maximum leg press (LPMAX) was recorded as well as vertical jump (VJHT; cm). Lastly, participants completed a 2,000m time trial on the rowing ergometer, where the 500m average split was used in analyses. Pearson’s product moment correlations were calculated across all variables and backwards stepwise linear regression was completed using VJHT, LPMAX, FFM, and mCSA as possible predictors of 500m performance. Results: The correlations coefficients among recorded variables were all very high and significant (r = 0.867-0.950; p = 0.001-0.04). The regression analysis indicated VJHT was a significant predictor of 500m time trial performance (R2=0.903; p<0.05). Conclusions: Although rowing may often be considered an endurance sport, the single best predictor of and the strongest correlation to time trial performance is vertical jump height as an index of power. Applications in Sport: Emphasis on plyometric training may serve as one of the most important aspects of athlete development beyond rowing form and mechanics, more so than strength or hypertrophy in collegiate rowers.

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Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in a Female Collegiate Powerlifter with Type-1 Diabetes

December 17th, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Benjamin H. Gleason1, Katherine N. Alexander1,2, and M. Catherine Fontenot3

1Department of Kinesiology, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA
2Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
3Department of Human Ecology, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA

Corresponding Author:
Benjamin H. Gleason, PhD, CSCS*D, RSCC, USAW-2
P.O. Box 3176
Ruston, LA, 71270
bgleason67@hotmail.com
334-546-1872

Benjamin H. Gleason, PhD, CSCS*D, RSCC, USAW2 is an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, LA. His research interests focus on methods of enhancing sport performance, professional roles found within high performance sport, and athlete monitoring.

Katherine N. Alexander, BS, is a Human Development and Family Studies doctoral student at Utah State University in Logan, UT.  Her research interests include developmental impacts of early sport-specialization on athletes and social support systems associated with sport participation.

Mary Catherine Fontenot, PhD, RD, LDN, is an assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics in the Department of Human Ecology at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, LA. Her research interests include food insecurity and its impact on health, nutrition, and aging.

Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in a Female Collegiate Powerlifter with Type-1 Diabetes

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Investigate a case of exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) in an athlete with Type-1 diabetes. Methods: The athlete shared relevant details from her training notebook, food journal, and medical information from the event with the researchers in a series of in-person interviews and electronic communications. The athlete’s food journal data was evaluated by a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist using computerized nutritional analysis program. The training program was evaluated by a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist in collaboration with the athlete to determine the precipitating factors for the injury. Results: Insufficient preparatory training, insufficient recovery, insufficient protein, and insufficient caloric intake were likely contributors to this ER injury. High caffeine intake, training in hot weather, and mild dehydration are also potential factors to an unknown extent. Conclusions: A well-organized, progressive return to heavy training is necessary to avoid musculoskeletal injury. In addition, athletes require appropriate nutrition to support the demands of heavy training and post-exercise recovery. While difficult to assess the extent at this time, athletes with diabetes could be at a higher risk for injury because of their health condition. Therefore, careful attention should be given to details of training, diet, glucose monitoring, and medication regimen, with supervision and education provided by trained professionals. Applications in Sport: This case study identifies specific precipitating factors of a rare case of exertional rhabdomyolysis in an athlete with type-1 diabetes. Knowledge gained from this case may be used to help other athletes prevent injury.

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Use of Wrist Guards for Gymnasts – A Systematic Review

December 10th, 2021|Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Stephanie Choo1,3, Patrick Smith2, and James L. Cook1,3

1University of Missouri Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia, MO, USA
2Columbia Orthopaedic Group, Columbia, MO, USA
3Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA

Corresponding Author:
James L. Cook, DVM, PhD, OTSC
William & Kathryn Allen Distinguished Chair in Orthopaedic Surgery
Director, Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics & Mizzou BioJoint® Center
Chief, Orthopaedic Research Division
University of Missouri
Missouri Orthopaedic Institute (4028A)
1100 Virginia Ave
Columbia, MO 65212
(573) 884-4689
(573) 882-1760 fax
(573) 884-0603 lab
CookJL@health.missouri.edu

Stephanie Choo, MD is a second-year orthopaedic surgery resident in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics at the University of Missouri. Her research interest is currently in the area of sports medicine with a focus on prevention and treatment of injuries in gymnastics.

Patrick A Smith, MD is an orthopaedic surgeon with the Columbia Orthopaedic Group and adjunct Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery for the University of Missouri. He specializes in arthroscopic surgery and sports medicine and has been involved in the care of athletes at Mizzou for more than 30 years.

James L. Cook, DVM, PhD, OTSC is the Allen Distinguished Chair, Professor, and Chief of the Division Orthopaedic Research at the University of Missouri, as well as Director of the Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics. His areas of research encompass sports medicine, biologic joint restoration, tissue engineering, biomarkers, and osteoarthritis.

Use of Wrist Guards for Gymnasts – A Systematic Review

ABSTRACT

This systematic review was designed to provide the best current evidence regarding wrist guard use in gymnastics based on relevant biomechanical effects and injury prevention. Evidence supports the use of wrist guards as protective equipment in the prevention of gymnasts’ wrist pain and injury. However, potentially negative effects of wrist guards on proprioception and performance were also reported, and critical gaps in knowledge regarding guard design, most effective indications, and application to female gymnasts remain. Further biomechanical and clinical studies are needed to fill these gaps in knowledge toward making evidence-based recommendations regarding use of wrist guards in gymnastics.

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GRIT: Predictability of Effort and Achievement in Physical Education

December 3rd, 2021|Sport Education, Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Meany, Brendan1, Weigand, Daniel2, Woolsey Conrad3, Lodato, Vincent4, Otto, Wendell5, & Owens, Robert6

1Department of Physical Education, Alan B. Shepard High School
2Department of Sport and Performance Psychology, University of Western States, Portland, OR, USA
3President at Optimum Performance & Wellness Associates, Kansas City, MO, USA
4Department of Sport and Performance Psychology, University of Western States, Portland, OR, USA
5Department of Sport and Performance Psychology, University of Western States, Portland, OR, USA
6Elite Performance Coach, Valor Performance, Greensboro, NC, USA

Corresponding Author:
Brendan Meany Ed.D.
208 Glenwood Ave
Willow Springs, IL
Brendanmeany44@gmail.com
708-906-9418

GRIT: PREDICTABILITY OF EFFORT AND ACHIEVEMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

ABSTRACT

McClelland (22) defined grit as someone who purposefully sets challenging long-term goals, undeterred, despite the absence of positive feedback. To define and quantify this phenomenon, Duckworth et al. (13) created grit theory and the psychometric assessment Grit-S (14). Research has supported Grit-S’s predictability of effort and achievement in predominately cognitive domains. Limited research exists in noncognitive fields such as kinetic output and physical activity, using objective third-party assessments, and in diverse populations (7, 11, 29, 32). Research and findings in this study reveal that grit is more complicated than a singular quality that determines effort and achievement. This quantitative study utilized a correlative design to establish relationships between Grit-S and kinetic output measured with heart rate monitors. A multiple regression analysis established associations with the main variables and population dynamics: age, gender, race, and socioeconomic status. The sample consisted of 134 students aged 15-18 at a heterogenous low-socioeconomic high school. Inconclusive results of this study warrant further investigation into Grit-S’s predictability in sport and exercise performance as well as other kinesthetic domains. Validating and testing new and unbiased instruments to determine how grit varies across other areas of student achievement can improve the educational experience and potential positive outcomes. This study has implications for anyone involved in the process of human development and performance. Teachers, coaches, parents, and leaders who adopt mastery and process-driven practices can design supportive, motivating, and purposeful organizations to enhance grittiness and overall well-being.

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Campus recreation sport club participants: Exploring subjective wellbeing

November 19th, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Laura M. Morris1, Jason Foster2, Cara L. Sidman3, and Alyssa Henyecz1

1School of Health & Applied Human Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USA
2Former School of Health & Applied Human Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USA
3College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

Corresponding Author:
Laura M. Morris, EdD
601 S. College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403
morrisl@uncw.edu
910-962-2451

Laura M. Morris, EdD, is an Assistant Professor of Recreation, Sport Leadership & Tourism Management at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Her research interests include leisure behavior, recreation/leisure in relation to lifelong health and wellbeing, happiness/positive psychology, and recreational sport and college student development.

Jason W. Foster, PhD, is a former Lecturer of Recreation, Sport Leadership & Tourism Management at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. His research interests include college student development, student identity development, student employment, and inclusive recreation facilities and policies.
Cara L. Sidman, PhD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in Population Health in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. Her research interests focus on wellbeing, online curriculum development and instruction, and college students.

Alyssa Henyecz is a recent graduate of the Recreation, Sport Leadership & Tourism Management program at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. She is currently a graduate student at The University of South Florida.  

Campus recreation sport club participants: Exploring subjective wellbeing

ABSTRACT

This research examined the subjective well-being scores of sport club participants at a mid-sized Southeastern university. Understanding college student mental health is a growing concern among higher education administrators. Purpose: The goal of this study was to investigate the subjective wellbeing of university sport club participants by examining gender and team sport participation versus individual sport participation. Methods: A survey methodology was adopted to measure participant (N=181) perceptions of subjective wellbeing utilizing a valid subjective happiness scale. Results: No differences were found between gender or sport type and subjective wellbeing in this sample. All sport club participants indicated high levels of subjective wellbeing. Conclusions:As campus recreation professionals seek to enhance college student wellbeing and mental health, sport clubs may be a valuable option. While this study provides some insight into mental health and happiness within the context of sport club participation, additional research is needed to explore measures of wellbeing in this setting. Applications to Sport: Sport club programming at the collegiate level may provide a positive mental health activity for students.

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