Concussions in Cheerleaders Reported from a Countywide Concussion Injury Surveillance System

Authors: Luis Gude, MD, Gillian Hotz, PHD

Corresponding Author:
Gillian Hotz Ph.D
Lois Pope LIFE Center – 1-40, (R-48)
1095 NW 14th Terrace, Miami, Florida 33136
ghotz@med.miami.edu
305-243-4004

Gillian A. Hotz, PhD is a research professor at the University of  Miami, Miller School of

Medicine and a nationally recognized behavioral neuroscientist and expert in pediatric and adult neurotrauma, concussion management, and neurorehabilitation. Dr. Hotz is the director of the KiDZ Neuroscience Center, WalkSafe, BikeSafe, and SkateSafe programs, and has been co-director of the Miller School of Medicine’s Concussion Program since 1995. She continues to assess and treat many athletes from Miami-Dade County public and private high schools, the University of Miami, and from other colleges and the community.

Concussions in Cheerleaders Reported from a Countywide Concussion Injury Surveillance System

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to advocate for the acceptance of cheerleading as a sport so that its athletes are eligible for the same resources available to other sports, such as concussion education programs and injury surveillance systems. The subjects of this study were cheerleaders from Miami Dade County public high schools who sustained a sports related concussion (SRC) from August 2015 to June 2019, identified from the Miami Concussion Model Concussion Injury Surveillance System. The database is compiled from reports submitted by certified athletic trainers after a suspected concussion, from post-injury ImPACT tests, and from patients who present to the University of Miami Sports Concussion Clinic for evaluation. A total of 29 cheerleaders were identified. The 2018-19 academic year accounted for 45% of reported concussions, representing a large increase in number compared to previous years. This was observed after increased emphasis was placed on certified athletic trainers to report SRC in cheerleaders. On average cheerleaders with SRC were withheld from sport for 26.2 days, and 38% had prolonged recovery of >28 days. Cheerleaders perform complex athletic maneuvers that put them at risk of injury, particularly SRC. If considered a sport, cheerleading would be afforded the same benefits as other sports, including resources for better facilities, mandatory concussion education, ATC availability, baseline neurocognitive testing, and inclusion in injury surveillance systems. Increased knowledge of the long-term sequelae of concussions and repetitive head injuries has led to the development of concussion education programs and injury surveillance systems to protect athletes from these types of injuries. Although competitive cheerleading has been recognized as a sport, cheerleading as a whole has not, putting its athletes at risk as its participants are not included in these safety programs. 

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2019-10-29T08:27:26-05:00November 15th, 2019|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Concussions in Cheerleaders Reported from a Countywide Concussion Injury Surveillance System

Aggressive Osteoblastoma of the Acetabulum in an 18-Year-Old Female Volleyball Player

Author: Tayleigh Talmadge MAT, ATC

Corresponding Author:
Valerie Moody PhD, LAT, ATC
32 Campus Dr. McGill 205
HHP Department
Missoula, MT 59812
406-243-2703 (office)
valerie.moody@umontana.edu

Tayleigh Talmadge is a recent graduate of the Masters in Athletic Training Program at the University of Montana. Valerie Moody is a Professor and Program Director of the Athletic Training Program at the University of Montana.

Aggressive Osteoblastoma of the Acetabulum in an 18-Year-Old Female Volleyball Player

Abstract

In a case study, an 18-year-old female volleyball player presented with persistent hip pain. Imaging revealed a lesion in the acetabulum and follow up biopsies led to the diagnosis of a benign osteoblastoma. The patient underwent a surgical resection and open reduction internal fixation of the acetabulum. Aggressive osteoblastomas of the acetabulum are rare in a young, active population; therefore, clinicians must be able to recognize the need to refer for further evaluation and understand the importance of a multidisciplinary individualized plan of care to ensure a successful return to play for the patient.

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2019-10-28T13:20:58-05:00October 25th, 2019|Contemporary Sports Issues, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Aggressive Osteoblastoma of the Acetabulum in an 18-Year-Old Female Volleyball Player

Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

Authors: Shemeika McCray & Joni M. Boyd, PhD. CSCS*D

Corresponding Author:
Joni M. Boyd, PhD, CSCS*D
216L West Center
Rock Hill, SC 29732
boydj@winthrop.edu
803-323-4936

Shemeika McCray is an undergraduate student in the Exercise Science Program at Winthrop University.  Dr. Joni Boyd is an Associate Professor of Exercise Science and Coaching at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC.

Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of dry needling within NCAA Division I athletes for muscle performance and/or recovery.Seventy-seven NCAA Division I Athletes completed an 15-item online survey sent via e-mail, which included demographics, exposure to dry needling, and perceptions of effectiveness. Those that had no experience of dry needling were asked to rate their perceptions and reasoning for non-exposure. The results indicated that 66% (n=51) of participants did not have experience with dry needling, while 34% (n=26) did have experience with dry needling. Athletes that experienced dry needling reported that dry needling was effective and comfortable for efficient and speedy recovery. They also reported that they would recommend others to use this recovery treatment.  Those athletes with non-exposure to dry needling reported that they would rather use other treatments, concerned with pain or bruising from dry needling or was not sure it would work for recovery.  These results help to fill current gaps in research on dry needling.  Future research could compare treatment protocols for pain management and/or recovery effectiveness.

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2019-10-21T15:46:38-05:00October 21st, 2019|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

Does Public Interest in Specific Injuries Increase When They Occur During Mixed Martial Arts Bouts? A Study of Google Search Patterns

Authors: William B. Roberts, MS; Michael E. Bibens BS; Matt Vassar, PhD.

Institution:Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, Dept. of Institutional Research

Institution Address: 1111 West 17th Street, Tulsa, OK, 74107

Corresponding Author: William Roberts; 1111 West 17th Street, Tulsa, OK, 74107; will.roberts10@okstate.edu

Conflicts of Interest: The authors have nothing to disclose.

Does Public Interest in Specific Injuries Increase When They Occur During Mixed Martial Arts Bouts? A Study of Google Search Patterns

ABSTRACT:

Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a combat sport that combines fighting techniques from many disciplines, such as wrestling, boxing, karate, Muay Thai, and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Despite this sport’s popularity –  influenced by the internet and social media –  the effect of high-profile MMA injuries on the public’s subsequent online search patterns has yet to be explored. In this study, we examined injuries from popular UFC bouts and observe whether the volume of Google searches for specific injuries increased after the associated fights. Google Trend (GT) searches were conducted in order to evaluate the relationship between fighter search popularity and injury search popularity during the week the fight took place. The percent change in search interest for injuries increased in 9 of 10 cases (Mdn = 446%, IQR: 168.75%-1643.75%). The findings of this study are expected to inform sports medicine personnel regarding specific platforms for sharing their insights and recommendations for the treatment and prevention of MMA injuries and other trauma-related injuries. This study highlights how investigation of public search interest may ultimately have a positive impact on health care outcomes.  Through the use of analyzing MMA injuries and the search patterns associated with them, the results of this study may aid sports medicine personnel in directing patients to online information that they have personally reviewed and approved.

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2019-09-05T08:45:30-05:00August 15th, 2019|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Does Public Interest in Specific Injuries Increase When They Occur During Mixed Martial Arts Bouts? A Study of Google Search Patterns

Kinetic Chain Injuries and Their Relationship to Subsequent ACL Tears

Authors: Jefferson Brand, MD, Richard Hardy, Ed.D., LAT, CSCS, Christopher Butler, Ph.D., Emily Monroe, MD

Corresponding Author:
Richard Hardy Ed.D., LAT, CSCS
111 17th Ave E #101, Alexandria, MN 56308
Fax: 320-589-6428
Office number: 320-589-6443
Cell number: 320-760-2031
Email: rhardy@heartlandorthopedics.com

Richard Hardy is a certified athletic trainer and coordinator of research at Heartland Orthopedic Specialists in Alexandria, MN. He is also contracted to the University of Minnesota Morris where he serves as an instructor and provides athletic training services.

Kinetic chain injuries and their relationship to subsequent ACL tears

ABSTRACT
Purpose: The relationship between previous kinetic chain injuries and the likelihood of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries remains under-explored. We compared the number of ankle injuries between subjects that had a surgically treated ACL tear to subjects that had a surgically treated shoulder injury (e.g., labral tear). We evaluated if a previous disruption of the lower kinetic chain (e.g., ankle injury) is a predisposing factor for ACL injuries. Our hypothesis was that ACL reconstruction patients will have a higher rate of previous ankle injuries than the control group (surgically treated labral tear).

Methods: Overall, 108 patients have undergone either ACL reconstruction or labral repair surgery. To insure similarity, we assessed Tegner activity level, knee alignment, and Beighton scale. Patients completed a questionnaire about demographics, ankle injury history, and the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scale. ANOVA statistically tested demographic data. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine if differences in previous ankle injury rates existed between groups.

Results: Overall, 63 patients (34 males/29 females) had ACL reconstruction and 45 patients (36 males/9 females) in the control group had surgery for labral lesions. No statistical differences occurred (P>0.05) for demographic data (age, BMI), Tegner activity scale, knee alignment, Beighton scale, or AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scores for each ankle. This suggests that the groups were comparable. Previous ankle injuries were common in both groups but not statistically significant.

Conclusions: Comparing surgically ACL injured knees to surgically treated labral tears, there was no significant difference in the rate of previous ankle injury. Therefore, previous ankle injuries may not predispose nor protect against future anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

Applications in sport: The knee is a link in the kinetic chain between the hip and ankle joints. Due to this, dysfunction of the ankle or hip joints could negatively affect the function of the knee joint. Therefore, we set out to see if ankle injury history is a predisposing factor for tears of the ACL of the knee. Through our research, we found that this was not the case; ACL tears occur independently to the kinetic chain. (more…)

2018-11-19T08:47:25-06:00December 6th, 2018|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Kinetic Chain Injuries and Their Relationship to Subsequent ACL Tears