Health and Lifestyle Behaviors of U.S. Masters World Cup Field Hockey Players

December 6th, 2019|Commentary, Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Karen Croteau1, Nina Eduljee1, Laurie Murphy1, Lisa Ahearn2, Stella L. Volpe3

1Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, 2Plymouth State University, 3Drexel University

Corresponding Author:
Karen Croteau
Department of Sport and Exercise Science
Saint Joseph’s College of Maine
Standish, ME 04084
kcroteau@sjcme.edu

Karen Croteau is Professor and Chair of the Department of Sport and Exercise Science at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine.

Nina Eduljee is Professor of Psychology at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine.

Laurie Murphy is Assistant Professor of Business at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine. 

Lisa Ahearn is Assistant Professor of Business at Plymouth State University, Plymouth, NH.

Stella Volpe is Professor and Chair of the Department of Nutrition Sciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

Health and Lifestyle Behaviors of U.S. Masters World Cup Field Hockey Players

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine health and lifestyle behaviors of United States Masters field hockey athletes who competed in the Masters Field Hockey World Cup in 2018. A total of 122 athletes (72 women, 50 men) completed the 42-item Health and Well-being of Masters Field Hockey Athletes Survey. Mean age was 50.1±8.3 years (range = 35 to 71). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 24.9±3.1 kg/m2. Participants rated their health as very good/excellent (86.9%) and their stress as rare/not at all (56.6%), had no major health conditions (61.5%) or medication use (70.5%), and had at least one injury (53.3%). Participants consumed ≥2 fruits (68.9%) and ≥2 vegetables (83.6%) per day, daily breakfast (68.0%), ≤1 sugar-sweetened beverage (86.9%) and ≥7 cups of water (54.1%) per day, and ≤2 alcoholic beverages per week (59.8%). Participants reported ≥7 hours of sleep per night (65.5%), and no/little restless sleep (52.4%). Just under half of participants reported sitting ≥5 hours per day (46.7%). Exercise frequency at ≥3 days per week and ≥30 minutes per day was 95.9% and 98.4%, respectively, with jogging (68.0%) the most common mode. Well-being scores were high. Overall, Masters field hockey athletes are healthy and practice lifestyle behaviors conducive to positive health.

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Ability for tennis specific variables and agility for determining the Universal Tennis Ranking (UTR)

November 29th, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Jennifer A. Kurtz* (1), Jake Grazer (2), Bradley Alban (3), Mike Martino (4)

Corresponding Author:
Jennifer A. Kurtz, MS
120 Coventry Court
Fayetteville, GA 30215
Jennifer.kurtz06@gmail.com
404-509-3384

Jennifer Kurtz is a doctoral student at The University of Georgia studying exercise physiology. She is also an assistant strength and conditioning coach at Elite Performance Institute.

Jake Grazer is an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia College & State University.

Bradley Alban is an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia College & State University.

Mike Martino is an Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia College & State University.

Ability for tennis specific variables and agility for determining the Universal Tennis Ranking (UTR): A Review and Recommendations

ABSTRACT

Our purpose was to investigate tennis specific measures to predict a player’s Universal Tennis Ranking (UTR) value and to see what percentage of the variables most influence the ranking. Methods: 15 male and 14 female athletes volunteered to participate in this study. Each volunteer performed no more than 16 total serves or eight from the add and deuce side down the “T”, no more than 16 total forehands and backhands down-the-line, three spider tests, and two trials of footwork taps in 30 seconds. Only the top two hits were analyzed. Results: A multiple linear regression was calculated predicting a player’s UTR based on serve, forehand, backhand, agility, and footwork taps. The regression equation was significant (F (5,23) = 29.66, p<.05) with an R squared value of 0.866. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess reliability between player serve (r=0.902), forehand (r=0.843) and backhand velocity (r=0.858), agility (r=-0.817), and footwork (r=0.472). More noticeable was the significant predictive value of serve (r=0.902) and backhand velocity (r=0.858) to the player’s UTR. Conclusion: These results underline the important relationship between the player’s UTR and tennis-specific characteristics (serve and backhand velocity) as assessed by the player’s stroke velocity. The ability of training regimens to improve tennis-specific metrics would improve performance qualities and the player’s UTR.

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Branding in women’s sports: A literature review

November 22nd, 2019|General, Sports Marketing, Women and Sports|

Authors: Isabell Mills

Corresponding Author:
Isabell Mills, PhD
1400 E Hanna Ave
Indianapolis, IN 46227
millsi@uindy.edu
219-805-3791

Isabell Mills is an assistant professor of sport management at the University of Indianapolis. Her research areas are sport and fitness branding.

Branding in women’s sports: A literature review

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to explore the gaps in the branding literature as it pertains to women’s sports. The review included 11 articles from sport management and business journals, investigating personal branding, team branding, and media coverage. Additionally, the review explored the practical implications as well as avenues of future research (i.e., conceptual model).

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Concussions in Cheerleaders Reported from a Countywide Concussion Injury Surveillance System

November 15th, 2019|Research, Sports Medicine|

Authors: Luis Gude, MD, Gillian Hotz, PHD

Corresponding Author:
Gillian Hotz Ph.D
Lois Pope LIFE Center – 1-40, (R-48)
1095 NW 14th Terrace, Miami, Florida 33136
ghotz@med.miami.edu
305-243-4004

Gillian A. Hotz, PhD is a research professor at the University of  Miami, Miller School of

Medicine and a nationally recognized behavioral neuroscientist and expert in pediatric and adult neurotrauma, concussion management, and neurorehabilitation. Dr. Hotz is the director of the KiDZ Neuroscience Center, WalkSafe, BikeSafe, and SkateSafe programs, and has been co-director of the Miller School of Medicine’s Concussion Program since 1995. She continues to assess and treat many athletes from Miami-Dade County public and private high schools, the University of Miami, and from other colleges and the community.

Concussions in Cheerleaders Reported from a Countywide Concussion Injury Surveillance System

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to advocate for the acceptance of cheerleading as a sport so that its athletes are eligible for the same resources available to other sports, such as concussion education programs and injury surveillance systems. The subjects of this study were cheerleaders from Miami Dade County public high schools who sustained a sports related concussion (SRC) from August 2015 to June 2019, identified from the Miami Concussion Model Concussion Injury Surveillance System. The database is compiled from reports submitted by certified athletic trainers after a suspected concussion, from post-injury ImPACT tests, and from patients who present to the University of Miami Sports Concussion Clinic for evaluation. A total of 29 cheerleaders were identified. The 2018-19 academic year accounted for 45% of reported concussions, representing a large increase in number compared to previous years. This was observed after increased emphasis was placed on certified athletic trainers to report SRC in cheerleaders. On average cheerleaders with SRC were withheld from sport for 26.2 days, and 38% had prolonged recovery of >28 days. Cheerleaders perform complex athletic maneuvers that put them at risk of injury, particularly SRC. If considered a sport, cheerleading would be afforded the same benefits as other sports, including resources for better facilities, mandatory concussion education, ATC availability, baseline neurocognitive testing, and inclusion in injury surveillance systems. Increased knowledge of the long-term sequelae of concussions and repetitive head injuries has led to the development of concussion education programs and injury surveillance systems to protect athletes from these types of injuries. Although competitive cheerleading has been recognized as a sport, cheerleading as a whole has not, putting its athletes at risk as its participants are not included in these safety programs. 

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Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

November 8th, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Jason C. Casey1, Robert L. Herron2, and Michael R. Esco3

1Department of Kinesiology, University of North Georgia, Oakwood, GA, USA
2Department of Sports Management, United States Sports Academy, Daphne, AL, USA
3Department of Kinesiology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA

Corresponding Author:
Robert L. Herron, MA, CSCS*D, ACSM-RCEP
1 Academy Drive
Daphne Al, 36526
rherron@ussa.edu
251-626-3303

Jason C. Casey, PhD, CSCS*D, EP-C is an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at the University of North Georgia in Oakwood, GA. His research interests focus on fatigue and recovery associated with exercise, athlete monitoring, and sport-related measurement issues.

Robert L. Herron, MA, CSCS*D, ACSM-RECP is currently faculty member and Sport Management doctoral student at the United States Sports Academy.  Robert’s areas of research interest include: measurement and evaluation in sport-related research and recovery from exercise stressors or sport injuries. 

Michael R. Esco, PhD, CSCS*D, FACSM is an associate professor of exercise physiology in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Alabama. His research interests are in the areas of heart rate variability, body composition, athletic monitoring, and cardiovascular physiology.

Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of using BMI-based equations (BEQ) to estimate body-fat percentage (BF%) in female-collegiate gymnasts.  As such, the agreement between BF% estimates with BEQ and air-displacement plethysmography (AP) were compared in twenty-two gymnasts (n = 22).  Body mass, height, and BF% were assessed via AP and BEQ [Jackson et al. (JBMI), Deurenberg et al. (DBMI), and Womersley & Durnin (WBMI)]. Results: The assessments produced the following estimated BF%: AP = 20.3 ± 3.6%; JBMI = 26.9 ± 3.9%; DBMI = 26.4 ± 2.2%; and WBMI = 27.9 ± 2.5%. BF% estimated via AP was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than each BEQ. Weak correlations were found between AP and BEQ (JBMI, r = 0.12; DBMI, r = 0.07; WBMI, r = 0.12). The limits of agreement (constant error ± 1.96 SD) for each BEQ compared to AP were: JBMI = 6.6 ­­± 9.5%; DBMI = 6.1 ­­± 7.8%; and WBMI = 7.6 ± 8.0%. These results suggest a wide range of individual differences existed between BEQ and AP. Furthermore, BEQ significantly overestimated BF% relative to AP in this gymnastics population.  Coaches and sport practitioners are in need of a quick, practical, inexpensive, and accurate method of body composition assessment. Based on this study, BEQ does not meet the needs of the practitioner when compared to AP. As a result, practitioners in the field need to consider other field methods of predicting BF% in collegiate female gymnasts.

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