The Influence of COVID-19 Upon Perceptions Of Parent Identity and Role Among Youth Sport Spectators

Authors: Jerry F. Reynolds II, Kristin E. Trainor, and Matt Moore

Department of Social Work,  Ball State University, Muncie, IN, USA

Corresponding Author:
Jerry F. Reynolds II, PhD, LMSW
1613 W. Riverside Ave
Muncie, IN 47304
jfreynolds@bsu.edu
765-285-1015

Jerry F. Reynolds II, PhD, LMSW is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Ball State University in Muncie, IN. His research interests focus on family dynamics and parenting experiences in youth sport settings.

Kristin E. Trainor, PhD, LCSW is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Ball State University.  Her research areas of interest include exploration of family dynamics and barriers to service provision in therapeutic settings.

Matt E. Moore is Chair and Associate Professor of Social Work at Ball State University. His research focuses upon the integration of social work principles in sport-based settings.

The Influence of COVID-19 Upon Perceptions of Parent Identity and Role Among Youth Sport Spectators

ABSTRACT

Parent experiences in youth sport settings during the COVID-19 pandemic are a notable and understudied phenomenon. Parents had varied experiences as a result of safety mandates and protocols that limited physical presence and engagement in their child’s sports activities. These limitations proved to be an emotional challenge for parents – balancing the responsibilities of protecting the safety of their families and providing sports experiences to promote both normalcy and acquire the life skills gained from sports participation in a fluid environment. In some instances, parents engaged in virtual spectating experiences which sought to minimize physical risks associated with COVID-19, but also did not require their physical presence to participate. Research on the virtual experience of parents is novel and from a sample of 112 parents across youth sport sectors in 18 states   how the spectating modality influenced parental roles and identities was examined. Virtual spectating experiences reflected many challenges for parents, but also prompted much gratitude for allowing continued engagement in their child’s sports activities. This exploratory research prompts larger questions urging sport-based professionals to examine the influences of spectating modalities on experiences of parents. The authors captured retrospective parent reactions to their personal spectating experience and generated a grounded theory diagram to demonstrate relationships between factors shaping the parent identity and role in this context. Implications for sport-based professionals are discussed.

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2022-04-01T08:27:43-05:00April 1st, 2022|Research, Sports Studies and Sports Psychology|Comments Off on The Influence of COVID-19 Upon Perceptions Of Parent Identity and Role Among Youth Sport Spectators

Changes in Vertical Jump Height and Sprint Time During a Congested Match Schedule in Youth Female Soccer Players

Authors: Joanne Spalding¹, Andrew R. Dotterweich², Jeremy Gentles², Brandi Eveland-Sayers², Adam L. Sayers²

¹Department of Health & Human Performance, Milledgeville, United States of America
²Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, United States of America

Corresponding Author:
Andrew R. Dotterweich
East Tennessee State University
Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation and Kinesiology
P.O. Box 70671
Johnson City, TN 37614
O: 423-439-5261
F: 423-439-5383
dotterwa@etsu.edu

Andy R. Dotterweich, PhD, is a Professor of Exercise Science at East Tennessee State University.  His research interests include youth sport, recreation management and policy, physical activity, long-term athlete development and community development.

Joanne Spalding, PhD, is a lecturer in Exercise Science at Georgia College and State University. Her research interests include long term athletic development and monitoring at the club, high school, and college level.

Jeremy Gentles, PhD is an Associate Professor of Sport Science and Coach Education at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, TN. His research interests include long term athlete monitoring, biochemical responses to exercise and sport technology.

Brandi Eveland-Sayers, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Exercise Science at East Tennessee State University. Her research interests include physical literacy, exercise adherence in youth, and long term athlete development.

Adam L. Sayers, PhD, is a faculty member in Global Sport Leadership at East Tennessee State University. He is also a network professional sport scientist for the United States Soccer Federation Youth Women’s National Teams, and a national instructor for USSF Coach Education.

Changes in Vertical Jump Height and Sprint Time During a Congested Match Schedule in Youth Female Soccer Players

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine changes in jump height and sprint time and to assess the relationship between relative changes in jump height and accumulated training load during a congested match schedule in youth female soccer players. Methods: This study included data from 14 youth female soccer players who performed countermovement jump testing pre- and post-match, post-tournament, as well as sprint testing pre- and post-tournament. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to compare changes in jump height over the course of the tournament. A paired sample t-test was performed to compare sprint time between pre- and post-tournament, and Pearson product moment correlations were used to determine the relationship between percent change in jump height and accumulated training load. Results: Jump height decreased significantly (p < 0.001) between time periods during the tournament, and sprint time increased significantly (p = 0.001). There was no significant relationship between percent change in jump height and accumulated training load. Conclusion: This study found that jump height decreased over the course of the tournament and there was a significant increase in sprint time from pre- to post-tournament. Applications in Sport: These results suggest that appropriate recovery strategies and training are needed to assist players in coping with the demands of a congested youth soccer schedule.

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2022-03-10T08:29:19-06:00March 11th, 2022|Research, Sports Management|Comments Off on Changes in Vertical Jump Height and Sprint Time During a Congested Match Schedule in Youth Female Soccer Players

Servant Leadership and the Relationship to Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness in Division I Athletic Departments

Authors: R. Michael Ross, Mark C. Vermillion

Department of Sport Management, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, USA

Corresponding Author:
R. Michael Ross, EdD
1845 Fairmount, Campus Box 127
Wichita, KS 67260-0127
mike.ross@wichita.edu
316-978-5980

R. Michael Ross, EdD, is an Assistant Professor of Sport Management at Wichita State University in Wichita, KS. His research interests include organizational leadership in sport, and best practices in sport management education.

Mark C. Vermillion, PhD, is currently a Professor and Interim Associate Dean of the College of Applied Studies at Wichita State University in Wichita, KS, and serves as the Chair of the Department of Sport Management at WSU.

Servant Leadership and the Relationship to Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness in Division I Athletic Departments

ABSTRACT

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between observed servant leadership behaviors of Division I athletic directors and self-reported basic work-related psychological needs satisfaction of Division I administrative (e.g., non-coaching) athletic department employees. This study examined the relationship between servant leadership behaviors in Division I athletic directors and the three elements of basic work-related psychological needs satisfaction including autonomy, competence, and relatedness.

Methods

A sample of athletic department employees in 35 randomly selected Division I athletic departments (n = 230) were sent an electronic survey via email that included questions on demographics, the seven-item Servant Leadership Scale (SL-7), and the 12-item adapted Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale (W-BNSA).

Results

The results of this study revealed a statistically significant, positive relationship exists (p < .001) with observed servant leadership behaviors in athletic directors and the athletic department employees’ work-related psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness.

Conclusions

This finding supported the view that greater levels of servant leadership behaviors in Division I athletic directors were associated with greater work-related basic psychological needs satisfaction of Division I athletic department employees.

Applications in Sport

The results of this research provide an opportunity for athletic directors at the highest level of intercollegiate competition (Division I) to adopt a leadership style that can contribute to the three components of basic psychological needs satisfaction in their employees.

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2022-02-17T08:06:07-06:00February 11th, 2022|Research, Sports Management|Comments Off on Servant Leadership and the Relationship to Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness in Division I Athletic Departments

Relationships Among Muscle Characteristics and Rowing Performance in Collegiate Crew Members

Authors: Omid Nabavizadeh1 and Ashley A. Herda, PhD2

1Geriatric Medicine Department, University of Colorado-School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States; https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8921-451X
2Department of Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences, University of Kansas-Edwards Campus, Overland Park, Kansas, United States; https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6184-2055

Corresponding Author:
Ashley A. Herda, Ph.D., CSCS*D
Assistant Professor
University of Kansas-Edwards Campus
Department of Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences
12604 Quivira Road, Overland Park, KS 66213
BEST 350X
Phone: (913) 897-8618
E-Mail: a.herda@ku.edu
https://hses.ku.edu/people/ashley-herda

Omid Nabavizadeh is a professional research assistant at the University of Colorado.

Ashley A. Herda, Ph.D. is an assistant professor for the exercise science program at the University of Kansas Edwards Campus in Overland Park. Dr. Herda completed her Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science and Health Promotion (2006) from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida. She continued her education at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma where she earned her Master of Science in Exercise Physiology (2008) under the mentorship of Jeff Stout and Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Physiology (2011) under the mentorship of Dr. Joel Cramer. Dr. Herda’s research interests include the investigation of the effects of nutritional supplements and/or exercise interventions on performance and body composition in men and women across the lifespan.

Relationships Among Muscle Characteristics and Rowing Performance in Collegiate Crew Members

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among measurements of muscle quality and rowing performance in college-aged club rowers. Methods: Ten men and women (mean ± SD: age: 22.1 ± 4.0 years; ht: 180.5 ± 8.3 cm; wt: 79.0 ± 13.5 kg) volunteered to participate in this study. Ultrasound images were collected at 50% thigh length in a transverse plane to quantify muscle size. The sum cross-sectional area (mCSA) of these muscles was reported. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was conducted to predict fat-free mass (FFM) and estimate total leg lean mass. One-repetition maximum leg press (LPMAX) was recorded as well as vertical jump (VJHT; cm). Lastly, participants completed a 2,000m time trial on the rowing ergometer, where the 500m average split was used in analyses. Pearson’s product moment correlations were calculated across all variables and backwards stepwise linear regression was completed using VJHT, LPMAX, FFM, and mCSA as possible predictors of 500m performance. Results: The correlations coefficients among recorded variables were all very high and significant (r = 0.867-0.950; p = 0.001-0.04). The regression analysis indicated VJHT was a significant predictor of 500m time trial performance (R2=0.903; p<0.05). Conclusions: Although rowing may often be considered an endurance sport, the single best predictor of and the strongest correlation to time trial performance is vertical jump height as an index of power. Applications in Sport: Emphasis on plyometric training may serve as one of the most important aspects of athlete development beyond rowing form and mechanics, more so than strength or hypertrophy in collegiate rowers.

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2022-01-14T08:17:53-06:00January 14th, 2022|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Relationships Among Muscle Characteristics and Rowing Performance in Collegiate Crew Members

Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in a Female Collegiate Powerlifter with Type-1 Diabetes

Authors: Benjamin H. Gleason1, Katherine N. Alexander1,2, and M. Catherine Fontenot3

1Department of Kinesiology, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA
2Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
3Department of Human Ecology, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA

Corresponding Author:
Benjamin H. Gleason, PhD, CSCS*D, RSCC, USAW-2
P.O. Box 3176
Ruston, LA, 71270
bgleason67@hotmail.com
334-546-1872

Benjamin H. Gleason, PhD, CSCS*D, RSCC, USAW2 is an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, LA. His research interests focus on methods of enhancing sport performance, professional roles found within high performance sport, and athlete monitoring.

Katherine N. Alexander, BS, is a Human Development and Family Studies doctoral student at Utah State University in Logan, UT.  Her research interests include developmental impacts of early sport-specialization on athletes and social support systems associated with sport participation.

Mary Catherine Fontenot, PhD, RD, LDN, is an assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics in the Department of Human Ecology at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, LA. Her research interests include food insecurity and its impact on health, nutrition, and aging.

Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in a Female Collegiate Powerlifter with Type-1 Diabetes

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Investigate a case of exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) in an athlete with Type-1 diabetes. Methods: The athlete shared relevant details from her training notebook, food journal, and medical information from the event with the researchers in a series of in-person interviews and electronic communications. The athlete’s food journal data was evaluated by a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist using computerized nutritional analysis program. The training program was evaluated by a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist in collaboration with the athlete to determine the precipitating factors for the injury. Results: Insufficient preparatory training, insufficient recovery, insufficient protein, and insufficient caloric intake were likely contributors to this ER injury. High caffeine intake, training in hot weather, and mild dehydration are also potential factors to an unknown extent. Conclusions: A well-organized, progressive return to heavy training is necessary to avoid musculoskeletal injury. In addition, athletes require appropriate nutrition to support the demands of heavy training and post-exercise recovery. While difficult to assess the extent at this time, athletes with diabetes could be at a higher risk for injury because of their health condition. Therefore, careful attention should be given to details of training, diet, glucose monitoring, and medication regimen, with supervision and education provided by trained professionals. Applications in Sport: This case study identifies specific precipitating factors of a rare case of exertional rhabdomyolysis in an athlete with type-1 diabetes. Knowledge gained from this case may be used to help other athletes prevent injury.

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2021-11-29T10:17:54-06:00December 17th, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in a Female Collegiate Powerlifter with Type-1 Diabetes
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