Health and Lifestyle Behaviors of U.S. Masters World Cup Field Hockey Players

Authors: Karen Croteau1, Nina Eduljee1, Laurie Murphy1, Lisa Ahearn2, Stella L. Volpe3

1Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, 2Plymouth State University, 3Drexel University

Corresponding Author:
Karen Croteau
Department of Sport and Exercise Science
Saint Joseph’s College of Maine
Standish, ME 04084
kcroteau@sjcme.edu

Karen Croteau is Professor and Chair of the Department of Sport and Exercise Science at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine.

Nina Eduljee is Professor of Psychology at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine.

Laurie Murphy is Assistant Professor of Business at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine. 

Lisa Ahearn is Assistant Professor of Business at Plymouth State University, Plymouth, NH.

Stella Volpe is Professor and Chair of the Department of Nutrition Sciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

Health and Lifestyle Behaviors of U.S. Masters World Cup Field Hockey Players

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine health and lifestyle behaviors of United States Masters field hockey athletes who competed in the Masters Field Hockey World Cup in 2018. A total of 122 athletes (72 women, 50 men) completed the 42-item Health and Well-being of Masters Field Hockey Athletes Survey. Mean age was 50.1±8.3 years (range = 35 to 71). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 24.9±3.1 kg/m2. Participants rated their health as very good/excellent (86.9%) and their stress as rare/not at all (56.6%), had no major health conditions (61.5%) or medication use (70.5%), and had at least one injury (53.3%). Participants consumed ≥2 fruits (68.9%) and ≥2 vegetables (83.6%) per day, daily breakfast (68.0%), ≤1 sugar-sweetened beverage (86.9%) and ≥7 cups of water (54.1%) per day, and ≤2 alcoholic beverages per week (59.8%). Participants reported ≥7 hours of sleep per night (65.5%), and no/little restless sleep (52.4%). Just under half of participants reported sitting ≥5 hours per day (46.7%). Exercise frequency at ≥3 days per week and ≥30 minutes per day was 95.9% and 98.4%, respectively, with jogging (68.0%) the most common mode. Well-being scores were high. Overall, Masters field hockey athletes are healthy and practice lifestyle behaviors conducive to positive health.

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2019-11-19T15:24:48-06:00December 6th, 2019|Commentary, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Health and Lifestyle Behaviors of U.S. Masters World Cup Field Hockey Players

Ability for tennis specific variables and agility for determining the Universal Tennis Ranking (UTR)

Authors: Jennifer A. Kurtz* (1), Jake Grazer (2), Bradley Alban (3), Mike Martino (4)

Corresponding Author:
Jennifer A. Kurtz, MS
120 Coventry Court
Fayetteville, GA 30215
Jennifer.kurtz06@gmail.com
404-509-3384

Jennifer Kurtz is a doctoral student at The University of Georgia studying exercise physiology. She is also an assistant strength and conditioning coach at Elite Performance Institute.

Jake Grazer is an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia College & State University.

Bradley Alban is an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia College & State University.

Mike Martino is an Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia College & State University.

Ability for tennis specific variables and agility for determining the Universal Tennis Ranking (UTR): A Review and Recommendations

ABSTRACT

Our purpose was to investigate tennis specific measures to predict a player’s Universal Tennis Ranking (UTR) value and to see what percentage of the variables most influence the ranking. Methods: 15 male and 14 female athletes volunteered to participate in this study. Each volunteer performed no more than 16 total serves or eight from the add and deuce side down the “T”, no more than 16 total forehands and backhands down-the-line, three spider tests, and two trials of footwork taps in 30 seconds. Only the top two hits were analyzed. Results: A multiple linear regression was calculated predicting a player’s UTR based on serve, forehand, backhand, agility, and footwork taps. The regression equation was significant (F (5,23) = 29.66, p<.05) with an R squared value of 0.866. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess reliability between player serve (r=0.902), forehand (r=0.843) and backhand velocity (r=0.858), agility (r=-0.817), and footwork (r=0.472). More noticeable was the significant predictive value of serve (r=0.902) and backhand velocity (r=0.858) to the player’s UTR. Conclusion: These results underline the important relationship between the player’s UTR and tennis-specific characteristics (serve and backhand velocity) as assessed by the player’s stroke velocity. The ability of training regimens to improve tennis-specific metrics would improve performance qualities and the player’s UTR.

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2019-12-04T14:27:14-06:00November 29th, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Ability for tennis specific variables and agility for determining the Universal Tennis Ranking (UTR)

Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

Authors: Jason C. Casey1, Robert L. Herron2, and Michael R. Esco3

1Department of Kinesiology, University of North Georgia, Oakwood, GA, USA
2Department of Sports Management, United States Sports Academy, Daphne, AL, USA
3Department of Kinesiology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA

Corresponding Author:
Robert L. Herron, MA, CSCS*D, ACSM-RCEP
1 Academy Drive
Daphne Al, 36526
rherron@ussa.edu
251-626-3303

Jason C. Casey, PhD, CSCS*D, EP-C is an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at the University of North Georgia in Oakwood, GA. His research interests focus on fatigue and recovery associated with exercise, athlete monitoring, and sport-related measurement issues.

Robert L. Herron, MA, CSCS*D, ACSM-RECP is currently faculty member and Sport Management doctoral student at the United States Sports Academy.  Robert’s areas of research interest include: measurement and evaluation in sport-related research and recovery from exercise stressors or sport injuries. 

Michael R. Esco, PhD, CSCS*D, FACSM is an associate professor of exercise physiology in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Alabama. His research interests are in the areas of heart rate variability, body composition, athletic monitoring, and cardiovascular physiology.

Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of using BMI-based equations (BEQ) to estimate body-fat percentage (BF%) in female-collegiate gymnasts.  As such, the agreement between BF% estimates with BEQ and air-displacement plethysmography (AP) were compared in twenty-two gymnasts (n = 22).  Body mass, height, and BF% were assessed via AP and BEQ [Jackson et al. (JBMI), Deurenberg et al. (DBMI), and Womersley & Durnin (WBMI)]. Results: The assessments produced the following estimated BF%: AP = 20.3 ± 3.6%; JBMI = 26.9 ± 3.9%; DBMI = 26.4 ± 2.2%; and WBMI = 27.9 ± 2.5%. BF% estimated via AP was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than each BEQ. Weak correlations were found between AP and BEQ (JBMI, r = 0.12; DBMI, r = 0.07; WBMI, r = 0.12). The limits of agreement (constant error ± 1.96 SD) for each BEQ compared to AP were: JBMI = 6.6 ­­± 9.5%; DBMI = 6.1 ­­± 7.8%; and WBMI = 7.6 ± 8.0%. These results suggest a wide range of individual differences existed between BEQ and AP. Furthermore, BEQ significantly overestimated BF% relative to AP in this gymnastics population.  Coaches and sport practitioners are in need of a quick, practical, inexpensive, and accurate method of body composition assessment. Based on this study, BEQ does not meet the needs of the practitioner when compared to AP. As a result, practitioners in the field need to consider other field methods of predicting BF% in collegiate female gymnasts.

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2019-10-28T14:00:06-05:00November 8th, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

Physical performance of youth football (soccer) players playing in European and National Leagues’ matches

Authors: Emmanouil Smpokos, Antonios Tsikakis, Ricardo Peres, Vangelis Lappas, Pedro Caravela,  Paulo Oliveira, Manolis Linardakis  and the ‘Olympiacos FC Academy Research Group’

Corresponding Author:
Emmanouil Smpokos
E-mail: msbokos@edu.med.uoc.gr or manosmpok@yahoo.gr (Dr. E. Sbokos)
Phone number: 0030 6945233315
Fax number: 0030 2155308859

Emmanouil Smpokos, PhD/MSc, is the senior physiologist at the Research and Development Department, Olympiacos Academy Football Club, Piraeus, Greece and fitness coach of the U-19; Antonios Tsikakis is the fitness coach at the Department in U-17 ; Ricardo Peres is the Technical Director and the Head coach of the U-19 of Olympiacos FC Academy ; Vangelis Lappas is the head of Goalkeepers’ Department and the Goalkeeper coach of the U-19 team of Olympiacos FC Academy; Pedro Caravela is the Head of the Scouting Department and assistant coach of U-19 team of Olympiacos FC Academy; Paulo Oliveira is assistant coach of Olympiacos FC Academy ; Manolis Linardakis, PhD/MSc, is Biostatistician at Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.  

Physical performance of youth football (soccer) players playing in European and National Leagues’ matches

ABSTRACT

The current study assessed the physical performance of youth Greek football (soccer) players between the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Youth and National Leagues’ matches. This effort was based on 271 measurements of nine physical/motor activities recruited from 25 players with a mean age of 18.4 (±1.2 years) during August 2017 and January 2018 from official-matches of UEFA Youth (n=6) and National Leagues (n=16). Measurements were recruited using Global-Positioning-System Technology-(GPS) and differences were assessed through analysis of covariance. 56.0% of the players were 18.0+ years old, 52.0% were midfielders, and 56.5% of players’ participations were recorded in full time (90.0+ minutes). Between the two competitions of UEFA Youth and National Leagues’ matches, it has been found that there is significant difference only in mean number of decelerations (71.4 vs. 61.7, respectively, p=0.010). High mean levels of total distance-(TD), very high-intensity-speed-running-distance-(VHS), maximal-sprinting-speed-distance-(MS), high-speed-running-(HSR), distance/time-(D/T), sprints, number of accelerations and maximum-velocity-(Vmax) were noticed as well as in UEFA Youth Leagues’ matches but did not differed significantly in relation to counterparts (p>0.05). The researchers observed that youth football players displayed similar efforts in all matches maintaining a high level of physical performance, without separating the matches according to the competition, due to the educational behavior adopted within the football academy of the club.

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2019-07-24T09:03:50-05:00August 1st, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Physical performance of youth football (soccer) players playing in European and National Leagues’ matches

Physical Exam Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Abnormalities in College Sport Athletes: A Systematic Review

Authors: Rose Uzoma Elekanachi

Corresponding Author:
Rose Uzoma Elekanachi. BPT, MSc, mMRTB
29 Shaw Road,
Bridgewater, MA, 02324
elekanachirose@gmail.com
5087141508

Rose Uzoma Elekanachi is a Nigerian Physical therapist and a recent Graduate of Bridgewater State University with a Masters in Physical Education with a concentration in Exercise Science. She is also a member of the Medical Rehabilitation Therapist Board in Nigeria.

Physical Exam Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Abnormalities in College Sport Athletes: A Systematic Review

ABSTRACT

The preparticipation physical examination (PPE) is an important area of the care and safety of any active athletic individuals. The evaluation involves a process that brings about the discovery of life threatening or disabling conditions that could prevent athletes’ participation from sporting activities or predispose them to injuries or death.

The preparticipation evaluation was not made to prevent or exclude athletes from participation, rather to help athletes practice safe sport participation. There has been a long ongoing debate on the inclusion and importance of cardiovascular analysis as a part of the PPE as cardiovascular abnormalities is a risk factor that predisposes collegiate athlete to sport injuries or even death. The objective of the proposed project was to identify the clinical methods that most effectively assess cardiovascular abnormalities in intercollegiate athletes through a systematic review of existing published research studies in which cardiovascular abnormalities in intercollegiate athletes were included as measurement variables.

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2019-06-20T11:20:52-05:00June 20th, 2019|Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Physical Exam Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Abnormalities in College Sport Athletes: A Systematic Review