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Improvements in Acute Explosive Power without a Subsequent Decrease in the Range of Motion of Passive Hip-Flexion Muscles in Taekwondo Players Using Foam Rollers

Authors:  Ani AGOPYAN1*, Tugce KAHRAMAN2, Meral KUCUK YETGIN1 and Demet TEKIN3

Affiliations: 1 Department of Coaching Education, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey; 2 National Education Foundation, Secondary School, Istanbul, Turkey; 3 Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Fenerbahce University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Corresponding Author:
Ani AGOPYAN, Assoc.Prof.
Department of Coaching Education, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Marmara University,
Marmara Universitesi Anadoluhisarı Yerleşkesi  Spor
Bilimleri Fakultesi  Goksu Mah. Cuma Yolu Cad. No:1PK.
34815 – Beykoz / Istanbul – TURKEY
+90 216 308 56 61; Mobile +90 532 714 17 51; Fax: +90 216 332 16 20
Email: aniagopyan@marmara.edu.tr

Ani Agopyan is an associate professor at Department of Coaching Education, Faculty of Sport Sciences in Marmara University, Istanbul-Turkey.

Improvements in Acute Explosive Power without a Subsequent Decrease in the Range of Motion of Passive Hip-Flexion Muscles in Taekwondo Players Using Foam Rollers

ABSTRACT

Background: Foam rolling (FR) has been developed as a popular intervention, however the acute effect of muscular and range of motion (ROM) function using a FR is unknown in young taekwondo players.

Objective: This study examined the acute effects of multiple (lower extremity and back part of the body) FR exercises on joint ROM and vertical jump performance in taekwondo athletes.

Methods: Nineteen (age: 13.21 ± 0.85 years) black-belt taekwondo athletes (nmale = 13; nfemale = 6), volunteered to participate of this study. Anthropometric measurements, Passive Straight-Leg Raise Test (PSLR) on each limb and vertical jump tests were performed on the first measurement day. In the second day, following a common warm-up model, participants performed FR exercises on five areas (erector spinae, iliotibial band, hamstrings, quadriceps, and calves) for three minutes (30 seconds/1 set for each area). The tests were administered to all participants again by swapping over on the third day. A Two-Way and Three-Way ANOVA Repeated Measures tests were performed.

Results: It was not observed any significant interaction between the three factors (time, side, or gender) and PSLR-ROM degrees of dominant and non-dominant legs (p>0.05). There were observed significant differences between the pre-and post-test measurements in the vertical jump height (+13.02%) and jump power (+5.23%) performance after FR exercises. Conclusion: Multiple FR exercises did not acute affect PSLR-ROM in taekwondo athletes. FR exercises may be effective within warm-up protocols and seems to be an efficient strategy to promote acute improvements in vertical jump performance in a short time period.

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2020-06-01T11:30:14-05:00July 31st, 2020|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Improvements in Acute Explosive Power without a Subsequent Decrease in the Range of Motion of Passive Hip-Flexion Muscles in Taekwondo Players Using Foam Rollers

The Effect of Resisted Sprinting on the Production of Horizontal Strength

Authors: Jacqueline Serrano, Brian Serrano

Corresponding Author:
Dr. Brian Serrano
Director of HPI Sports Medicine
HPI Sports Medicine
28062 Forbes Road Unit D
Laguna Niguel, CA 92691
Brianserrano171@gmail.com
818-926-7269

Jacqueline Serrano is the Clinic Director of HPI Sports Medicine. She is a Chiropractor with a passion for Sports Medicine and Nutrigenomics. She uses her master’s degree in Molecular Pharmacology to practice functional medicine and seeks to help patients starting from their internal physiology.

Brian Serrano is the Director of Rehabilitation and Performance at HPI Sports Medicine and currently performs research in the field of Sports Medicine as it relates to overhead athletes. He is a Chiropractor and Athletic Trainer who seeks to bridge between research, rehabilitation, and performance.

The Effect of Resisted Sprinting on the Production of Horizontal Strength

ABSTRACT

Strength is a crucial aspect of sport performance and increasing strength is an important aspect of strength and conditioning programs for athletics. Strength and conditioning professionals are constantly innovating programming methods to increase attributes that accurately translate onto the field of play. PubMed, CINAHL, and EBSCO were searched for systematic reviews from 2000-2020 which used resisted sprinting, either pushing or pulling and their effect on horizontal strength for include in this literature review. Resisted sprinting results in a horizontal impulse that is sport specific to horizontal strength (p<.05). The most effective loading for resisted sprinting seems to be 10-30% of BW (p<0.05). Resisted sprinting in the form of sled pulling seems to be more sport specific because of its use of the upper extremities (CI 95%). Resisted sprinting seems to be a cost-efficient and technically effective form of increase horizontal strength, which can be incorporated into training and seems to have a superior effect to vertical based training modalities.

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2020-06-01T10:12:19-05:00July 24th, 2020|Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on The Effect of Resisted Sprinting on the Production of Horizontal Strength

The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on High Performance Secondary School Student-Athletes

Author: Isabella Q. Liu1

1John McCrae Secondary School, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Corresponding Author:
Isabella Q. Liu
P.O. Box 34102, 3781 Strandherd Drive
Ottawa, ON, Canada, K2J 5B1
isabellaqqliu@hotmail.com
613-825-6788

Isabella Liu is a rising senior student in the High Performance Athlete Program at John McCrae Secondary School in Ottawa, Canada. She has been doing artistic swimming for the past nine years, and is currently training with GO Capital Synchro Club’s national-stream program. She was a member of the 2019 Ontario Artistic Swimming Junior Provincial Team and competed with them at the 2019 UANA Pan American Artistic Swimming Championships.

The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on High Performance Secondary School Student-Athletes

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a worldwide disruption of the sporting industry. Secondary school student-athletes, as a distinct population, are facing unique social and academic challenges. It is important to identify some of the unique challenges this population currently faces, and understand where our student-athletes are at mentally and physically. This is in order to ensure their needs are addressed, and the health and wellbeing of this population is protected. This study aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Canadian high performance secondary school student-athletes.

Methods: On April 29, 2020, six weeks after a lockdown was imposed in Ontario, Canada, a Google Forms online survey was sent out to local secondary school students participating in high performance sports to collect data on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their sports and themselves.

Results: In 24 hours, 115 surveys were completed. The median age of respondents was 16/17, with 66 (57.4%) females and 49 (42.6%) males. 93% of respondents had at least one cancellation or postponement of important competitions or meets due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The athletes reported negative psychological impacts from the pandemic, with 90.5% expressing feelings of isolation and disconnection and 79.1% having feelings of anxiety, depression, and frustration. 86.1% of the respondents identified a worry for a loss of fitness during this time, with 91.3% concerned about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their next season. Nonetheless, 84.3% of the respondents still plan to return to training once the pandemic is over, and 74.8% believe they can catch up to their previous strength/technical level after the pandemic.

Conclusions: Findings of this study suggests that more attention should be paid to secondary school student-athletes, as they are young and tackling both academic and athletic challenges.Student-athletes should be provided additional mental health support during this maelstrom of changes. Specific in-home virtual training during COVID-19 outbreak may be further strengthened and improved to protect the mental health of the athletes, especially to reduce the risk of anxiety and depression.

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2020-07-14T17:04:51-05:00July 22nd, 2020|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on High Performance Secondary School Student-Athletes

Gender Differences in Shoulder Strength, Range of Motion, and Functional Movement across a Division III Collegiate Swim Season

Authors: Andrew M Busch EdDa, Tyler L Mansfielda, Morgan L Barnarda, Elizabeth L Mayioa

aDepartment of Health and Human Kinetics, Ohio Wesleyan University

Corresponding Author:
Andrew M Busch
107C Edwards Gymnasium
61 S. Sandusky St.
Delaware OH 43220
Phone: (740) 368-3864
ambusch@owu.edu

Conflict of Interest and Source of Funding: There are no conflicts of interest to report and no funding was received for this study.

Andrew Busch is an assistant professor at Ohio Wesleyan University and is an alumni of the United States Sports Academy.

Gender Differences in Shoulder Strength, Range of Motion, and Functional Movement across a Division III Collegiate Swim Season.

ABSTRACT

Background: Musculoskeletal variables used to identify at-risk swimmers for shoulder injuries are inconsistent, possibly resulting from fluctuations in training volume across a competitive season or gender differences in training adaptations.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in shoulder strength, range of motion, and functional movement across a competitive collegiate swim season.

Methods: Twenty-nine healthy swimmers underwent preseason and postseason testing for glenohumeral internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) range of motion (ROM); maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength for IR and ER; and Functional Movement Screen(FMSTM) shoulder mobility scores. Glenohumeral ROM was performed using a digital inclinometer; strength tests were performed using a handheld dynamometer and normalized for body weight.

Results:  Glenohumeral ROM significantly decreased in both arms of both genders postseason. Gender differences showed males exhibited less IR in dominant (p = .002) and nondominant (p = .001) arms preseason, and only nondominant arm (p = .004) postseason. Relative MVIC strength did not change in males postseason, whereas females showed significant improvement in IR strength for both dominant (p = .008) and nondominant (p = .005) arms, and ER strength for the nondominant arm (p = .001). Gender differences revealed males had greater relative strength for IR and ER preseason, with no differences noted between genders postseason. No differences were observed in FMSTM shoulder mobility scores between genders or across the season.

Conclusion: Decreases in glenohumeral ROM were observed in both arms of both genders in the postseason. Females noted significant increases in relative MVIC strength while males showed no differences in relative strength measures. There were no differences noted in FMSTM shoulder mobility scores based on gender.

Applications in Sport: Male and female swimmers may respond differently to the demands of a collegiate swim season when comparing shoulder strength values. Postseason glenohumeral ROM measures all resulted in marked decreases in both arms for both genders.

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2020-06-01T09:24:45-05:00July 17th, 2020|Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Gender Differences in Shoulder Strength, Range of Motion, and Functional Movement across a Division III Collegiate Swim Season

The Coronavirus and Sport Management Pedagogy: Developing Student Learning Opportunities Based on Participatory Sport Businesses Impacted by the Pandemic

Author: Michael J. Diacin

Corresponding Author:
Michael J. Diacin, Ph.D.
University of Indianapolis
1400 E. Hanna Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46227
diacinm@uindy.edu
317-791-5703

Michael J. Diacin is an Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Sport Sciences. His research interests include sport management education and curriculum.

The Coronavirus and Sport Management Pedagogy; Developing Student Learning Opportunities Based on Participatory Sport Businesses Impacted by the Pandemic

Abstract

The presence of the Coronavirus and subsequent mandates to suspend operations has affected ownership, employees, and customers of community-based sport and recreation focused business. When operations resume, these businesses will aim to accomplish objectives of attracting new and repeat customers. These businesses will need to create messages in order to reassure consumers and create incentives in order to entice customers to return. The purpose of this essay is to articulate challenges community-based sport and recreation businesses will face when permission to resume operations is granted and propose tactics that could be utilized in order to rebuild the customer base. In addition, this pandemic provides an authentic learning opportunity for students in sport communication/management programs. As a result, suggestions for developing a learning opportunity for students based on community-based sport and recreation business affected by Coronavirus related shutdowns will be offered.

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2020-07-06T10:37:10-05:00July 15th, 2020|Sports Management|Comments Off on The Coronavirus and Sport Management Pedagogy: Developing Student Learning Opportunities Based on Participatory Sport Businesses Impacted by the Pandemic