Campus recreation sport club participants: Exploring subjective wellbeing

Authors: Laura M. Morris1, Jason Foster2, Cara L. Sidman3, and Alyssa Henyecz1

1School of Health & Applied Human Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USA
2Former School of Health & Applied Human Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USA
3College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

Corresponding Author:
Laura M. Morris, EdD
601 S. College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403
morrisl@uncw.edu
910-962-2451

Laura M. Morris, EdD, is an Assistant Professor of Recreation, Sport Leadership & Tourism Management at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Her research interests include leisure behavior, recreation/leisure in relation to lifelong health and wellbeing, happiness/positive psychology, and recreational sport and college student development.

Jason W. Foster, PhD, is a former Lecturer of Recreation, Sport Leadership & Tourism Management at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. His research interests include college student development, student identity development, student employment, and inclusive recreation facilities and policies.
Cara L. Sidman, PhD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in Population Health in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. Her research interests focus on wellbeing, online curriculum development and instruction, and college students.

Alyssa Henyecz is a recent graduate of the Recreation, Sport Leadership & Tourism Management program at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. She is currently a graduate student at The University of South Florida.  

Campus recreation sport club participants: Exploring subjective wellbeing

ABSTRACT

This research examined the subjective well-being scores of sport club participants at a mid-sized Southeastern university. Understanding college student mental health is a growing concern among higher education administrators. Purpose: The goal of this study was to investigate the subjective wellbeing of university sport club participants by examining gender and team sport participation versus individual sport participation. Methods: A survey methodology was adopted to measure participant (N=181) perceptions of subjective wellbeing utilizing a valid subjective happiness scale. Results: No differences were found between gender or sport type and subjective wellbeing in this sample. All sport club participants indicated high levels of subjective wellbeing. Conclusions:As campus recreation professionals seek to enhance college student wellbeing and mental health, sport clubs may be a valuable option. While this study provides some insight into mental health and happiness within the context of sport club participation, additional research is needed to explore measures of wellbeing in this setting. Applications to Sport: Sport club programming at the collegiate level may provide a positive mental health activity for students.

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2021-11-11T14:12:27-06:00November 19th, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Campus recreation sport club participants: Exploring subjective wellbeing

Coaching Leadership Behaviors: A Comparison of High School and Collegiate Wrestling Coaches

Authors: Jason J. Holder, Daniel M. Smith, and Thaddeus J. France, III

Springfield College, Department of Physical Education and Health Education

Corresponding Author:
Jason J. Holder, Ph.D.
Department of Physical Education and Health Education
Springfield College
263 Alden Street, Springfield, MA 01109
jholder2@springfield.edu
603-490-6785

Dr. Jason J Holder is an associate professor and head wrestling coach in the Physical Education and Health Education Department at Springfield College. 

Dr. Daniel M. Smith is an assistant professor of research and statistics in the Physical Education and Health Education Department at Springfield College.

Thaddeus J. France III is a professor in the Physical Education and Health Education Department at Springfield College.

Coaching Leadership Behaviors: A Comparison of High School and Collegiate Wrestling Coaches

Abstract

Purpose: In this study, we compared the coaching behaviors and leadership styles of high school and collegiate (NCAA Division III) head wrestling coaches.

Methods: To assess student-athletes’ perceptions of their coaches’ behaviors, the Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S) was administered to high school (n = 77) and collegiate (n = 62) student-athletes at three times over the wrestling season (preseason, midseason, postseason). To assess coaches’ self-perceived leadership styles, the Leadership Scale for Sport (LSS) was administered one time to high school (n = 24) and collegiate (n = 24) head wrestling coaches.

Results: Significant increases across the season were indicated for the CBS-S subscales of physical training and conditioning, mental preparation, goal setting, competition strategies, and positive rapport. For the CBS-S subscales of technical skills and competition strategies, high school head coaches scored significantly higher than collegiate coaches. There were no significant differences in LSS subscale scores when comparing high school and collegiate coaches.

Conclusions: The findings of the current study can be useful in identifying the multiple factors involved in successful coaching. They could prove helpful for increasing coaches’ awareness of high school and collegiate student-athlete perceptions of coaching behaviors throughout three different time points of the season.

Applications in Sport: The results provide an opportunity for coaches to improve in areas where coaches of their particular level (high school, collegiate) are lacking and use this feedback to gauge their own coaching behaviors and leadership styles.

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2021-11-11T08:46:56-06:00November 12th, 2021|Research, Sports Coaching|Comments Off on Coaching Leadership Behaviors: A Comparison of High School and Collegiate Wrestling Coaches

The National Football League Combine: Do Performance Measures Predict Draft Status Among NFL Draftees

Authors: Raymond Tucker, Jr. 1,Willie J. Black, Jr.2

1Department of Kinesiology, University of Houston Victoria, Victoria, TX, USA.
2Department of Kinesiology, University of Houston Victoria, Victoria, TX, USA.

Corresponding Author:
Willie J. Black, Jr.
University of Houston at Victoria
3007 N. Ben Wilson
Victoria, Texas 77901
Blackw@uhv.edu
Phone: (361) 570-4298

Raymond Tucker, D.S.M., CFSC, CSCS * D, XPS, FMS, USATF, USAW is an Associate Professor of Kinesiology at the University of Houston Victoria in Victoria, TX. His research interested focus on leadership skills used by coaches and program design and measure of performance used in strength and conditioning.

Willie J. Black, Jr. Ed.D.  is an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at the University of Houston in Victoria, Texas. His research interests focus on leadership, physical education pedagogy, and social justice in physical education.

The National Football League Combine: Do Performance Measures Predict Draft Status Among NFL Draftees

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive ability of the performance measures used at the National Football League Scouting Combine to predict draft status from 2018 to 2020. Data were collected and analyzed from six performance measures used at the combine: 40-yd dash, 20-yd shuttle, bench press, three-cone drill, vertical jump, and broad jump. A total of 1,009 players were invited to the combine between 2018 and 2020. Several negative correlations were detected in the performance measures, which suggests that higher scores in the following performance measures faster 40-yard dash, higher vertical, elevated bench press and longer broad jump are associated with better draft position. For example, the correlation between vertical and draft position for WRs is -.286: this means that a higher jump is associated with better draft position. The results conclude combine performance is not a good predictor of draft position except maybe for the position of WR, but it is valuable at distinguishing between getting drafted or not. That results would suggest that once a certain level of physical performance is achieved, then a player will get drafted. Otherwise, there are probably other factors (e.g., the position they play, intangibles, etc.) that determine when they get drafted.

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2021-10-20T09:40:32-05:00November 5th, 2021|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on The National Football League Combine: Do Performance Measures Predict Draft Status Among NFL Draftees

Role stressors in sport: A comparison of role stress and job satisfaction among sport providers.

Authors: Chuck Provencio1, Daewon Yoon1, Tiara Rose Johnson2, John C. Barnes, PhD1

1Department of Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
2Department of Educational Psychology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Corresponding Author:
Chuck Provencio
126 Johnson Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
cprovencio88@gmail.com
605-690-7035

Chuck Provencio is a Ph.D. Candidate and Research Assistant at The University of New Mexico.

Role stressors in sport: A comparison of role stress and job satisfaction among sport providers.

ABSTRACT

Role stress occurs when individuals’ responsibilities are ambiguous or in conflict with their role expectations. Purpose: Using the theory of role dynamics (37), this study explored role stress and job satisfaction among sport providers (n = 195). The purpose of this study was to determine whether commonly education, training, and other variables impacted role stress, and whether role stress impacted job satisfaction among sport providers. Methods: The researchers used Bowling et al.’s (10) role stressors scale to measure role stressors and Spector’s (57) Job Satisfaction Survey to assess job satisfaction, along with demographic information, length of time in the role, level of education, and job training. Results/Conclusions: Findings indicated that education and job trainings were not significant predictors of role stress or job satisfaction, but other variables were found to be significant. Implications and recommendations for future studies are further discussed. Applications in Sport: These findings indicate that newer and younger coaches may require some support from sport managers. Additional applications discussed in the manuscript.

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2021-10-20T08:58:38-05:00October 29th, 2021|Research, Sport Education|Comments Off on Role stressors in sport: A comparison of role stress and job satisfaction among sport providers.

COVID-19 and its impact on student-athlete depression and anxiety: the return to campus

Authors: Peter J Economou, Victoria Glascock, Mark Louie, Polina Poliakova, William Zuckerberg

Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, Rutgers University, USA

Corresponding Author:
Victoria Glascock
203 South Adelaide Ave
Highland Park, NJ 08904
vcg24@gsapp.rutgers.edu
732-668-4617

Dr. Peter Economou, the Principal Investigator holds a Ph.D in counseling psychology with a concentration in neuropsychology. He conducts research on mindfulness and meditation in sports.

Dr. Mark Louie, a research assistant and Postdoc to the PI, holds an Ed.D in Applied Exercise Physiology, and a Masters in Psychological Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a licensed counselor in both New Jersey and New York.

Victoria Glascock, Polina Poliakova, and William Zuckerberg are research assistants for the GSAPP Performance Psychology Center.

COVID-19 and its Impact on Student-Athlete Depression and Anxiety: The Return to Campus

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic prompted the NCAA to abruptly cancel all sporting events, to help slow the spread of the virus. As such, measures such as social-distancing and work from home orders, were implemented nationwide. While effective, both safety measures are socially disruptive with the potential to cause psychological disturbances such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and other behavioral disorders. To date, there is no literature that examines the consequences of abrupt mid-season cancellation for student-athletes, and the subsequent return to campus in Fall of 2020 brought on by a global crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic. To explore the mental health consequences of such termination and subsequent return to campus, student-athletes were surveyed on their experience with returning to campus amidst a global pandemic. Our results indicate that there were increased feelings of depression and anxiety upon returning to campus in Fall 2020.

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2021-10-20T08:13:06-05:00October 22nd, 2021|Research, Sports Studies and Sports Psychology|Comments Off on COVID-19 and its impact on student-athlete depression and anxiety: the return to campus
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