About U.S. Sports Academy

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far U.S. Sports Academy has created 774 blog entries.

Are NBA Players Paid to Perform in the Clutch?

Authors: Kevin Sigler

Corresponding Author:
Kevin Sigler, PhD
601 College Road
Department of Economics and Finance
Cameron School of Business
UNC Wilmington
Wilmington, NC 28403
siglerk@uncw.edu
910-200-2076

Kevin Sigler is Professor of Finance in the Cameron School of Business, UNC Wilmington

Are NBA Players Paid to Perform in the Clutch?

ABSTRACT

The star players in the National Basketball Association (NBA) are paid extremely well.  In the 2018-19 season there were 60 players in the NBA that were paid $17 million or more for their services.  Stephen Curry was the highest paid at $37.5 million (Table 1).  LeBron James, Chris Paul, and Russell Westbrook tied for second at salaries of $35.7 million (1).  This study examines if the highest 60 paid NBA players are compensated for performing in the clutch.  The research finds that the pay for the sample of highly paid NBA players is related to their field goal percentage and to assists to other players during the last four minutes of close games when the score is within five points.  Their pay is tied significantly to field goal attempts in the last minute of close games as well.  It appears from the results that NBA organizations reward players who at the end of close games make shots, are able to handle the ball, and set up their teammates to score as well as be willing to take shots in the last minute of tightly contested games.

(more…)
2020-02-19T09:49:46-06:00February 28th, 2020|General|Comments Off on Are NBA Players Paid to Perform in the Clutch?

The Effects of Competitive Orientation on Performance in Competition

Authors: Jeffrey C. Ives, Kristin Neese, Nick Downs, Harrison Root, Tim Finnerty

Corresponding Author:
Jeffrey C. Ives, Ph.D.
Department of Exercise Science and Athletic Training
Danby Road
Ithaca College
Ithaca, NY  14850
jives@ithaca.edu
607-274-1751

Jeffrey C. Ives is a professor of motor behavior in the Department of Exercise Science and Athletic Training at Ithaca College

The Effects of Competitive Orientation on Performance in Competition

ABSTRACT

The competitive environment is reported to influence greater exercise intensity in most persons, thus enhancing practice and training. This effect may be mediated by individual characteristics and the nature of the competitive environment. In particular, persons with non-competitive traits may find live one-on-one physical competition discouraging to full engagement and high effort, but there is little research to support this belief. The purpose of this experiment, thus, was to evaluate the influence of live competition versus no competition (i.e., solo) in persons classified as competitive versus less competitive, or athletes versus non-athlete. After informed consent, 91 subjects were scored on competitive trait using the SOQ tool and grouped into three competitive trait groups (Low, Mid, High). Subjects were also classified as a collegiate varsity athlete or non-varsity athlete.  Subjects engaged in maximal vertical jump trials and maximal 40 yard sprint trials under solo conditions and in the presence of another competitor. Maximal single trial performance in the solo condition was compared to the best competition performance and the average competition performance. Repeated measures ANOVA results indicated no significant differences from the solo best trial to the average competition trial in vertical jump height or sprint times. However, the subjects’ single best competition sprint trial was significantly faster than the best solo sprint trial, but the best competition vertical jump was not significantly higher than the solo jump. Persons grouped as having a higher competitive trait, and those classified as varsity athletes, had faster sprints and higher jumps, but all groups performed similarly in response to competition. In conclusion, competition produced similar results in all groups, indicating that even less competitive persons and non-varsity athletes respond competitively when in certain circumstances.

(more…)
2020-02-24T10:50:37-06:00February 21st, 2020|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on The Effects of Competitive Orientation on Performance in Competition

Disordered Eating and Compulsive Exercise in Collegiate Athletes: Applications for Sport and Research

Authors: Ksenia Power, M.S., Sara Kovacs, Ph.D., Lois Butcher-Poffley, Ph.D., Jingwei Wu, Ph.D., and David Sarwer, Ph.D.

Corresponding Author:
Ksenia Power, PhD Candidate
1800 N. Broad Street, Pearson Hall, 242
Philadelphia PA, 19122
tug82764@temple.edu
267-766-8938

Ksenia Power is a Doctoral Candidate and an Instructor of Record in the Department of Kinesiology at Temple University, majoring in Psychology of Human Movement.  She is also a Volunteer Assistant Women’s Tennis Coach at Temple University.

Disordered Eating and Compulsive Exercise in Collegiate Athletes: Applications for Sport and Research

ABSTRACT

Over the last three decades, a large body of research has examined the issue of eating disorders, both formal diagnoses and subclinical features, as well as compensatory behaviors in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. In general, this literature suggests that large numbers of student-athletes engage in disordered eating and compensatory behaviors; smaller percentages have symptoms that reach the threshold of formal diagnoses. Increased symptoms are associated with reduced athletic and academic performance, both of which may impact psychosocial functioning later in adulthood. Unfortunately, a number of methodological shortcomings across this body of research (e.g., studies with insufficient sample sizes, inappropriate comparison groups, and suboptimal or biased psychometric measures) limit the confidence that can be placed in these findings, underscoring the need for a new generation of studies. This paper provides an overview of this literature, focusing on issues of gender differences, sport type, and age. It also highlights the relationship between disordered eating and compulsive exercise, a compensatory behavior that is highly prevalent among collegiate athletes.  The health and athletic performance consequences of eating disorders in conjunction with compulsive exercise are also discussed.  In addition, a focus on more recently recognized eating disorders, such as binge eating disorder and the night eating syndrome is underscored.  Future work in this area needs to include the most methodologically rigorous measures available in order to aid most appropriately coaches and athletic trainers in promptly identifying at-risk athletes and to inform future prevention and treatment efforts.

(more…)
2020-01-31T09:34:14-06:00February 14th, 2020|Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Disordered Eating and Compulsive Exercise in Collegiate Athletes: Applications for Sport and Research

Concussion in the Collegiate Equestrian Athlete

Authors: Tasneem Zahira PhD,  Timothy Henry PhD ATC, Michael L. Pilato MS ATC

Corresponding Author:
Michael L. Pilato MS ATC
1000 East Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14623
mikep316@yahoo.com
585-329-6463

Michael L. Pilato is an athletic trainer with Monroe Community College in Rochester, N.Y. He has been researching sports medicine for the equestrian athlete since 2003 and has been published in peer and non-peer reviewed journals.

Tasneem Zaihra PhD.
Department of Mathematics State University New York College at Brockport
350 New Campus Dr, Brockport, NY 14420
tzahira@brockport.edu
585-3952075

Tasneem Zaihra is an assistant professor of statistics in the department of mathematics, SUNY Brockport. She has many presentations and publications in peer-reviewed journals, to her credit.

Timothy Henry PhD. ATC
Department of HPERD State University New York College at Brockport
350 New Campus Dr, Brockport, NY 14420
thenry@borckport.edu
585-395-5357

Timothy Henry is director of the athletic training program at SUNY Brockport. He is also a reviewer for The Journal of Sport Rehabilitation and The Journal of Athletic Training.

Concussion in the Collegiate Equestrian Athlete

ABSTRACT

Equestrian sports, in general, pose a significant risk of concussion. Minimizing the risk of concussion has been a focal point in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to describe concussion and explore potential association(s) between groups of musculoskeletal injuries and Body Mass Index (BMI) on the risk and odds of concussion in the collegiate equestrian athlete. Forty-three schools, ranging from DI to DIII, from the Eastern United States were selected from the NCAA and Intercollegiate Horse Show Association’s websites. Self-reported injury and demographic data was collected through an online survey created in Mach Forms. Seventy-three participants completed the online survey (women n=71, men=2). Aggregate descriptive data is reported on all subjects. After removing data on 2 men, and a single female with incomplete data, the data from 70 females with complete data was analyzed using chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests and ordinal logistic regression. Pearson’s chi-squared as well as Fisher’s exact test (p-value =.0288 and.0297 respectively) indicates the risk of having concussion with 0 UE injury is not the same as with 1 or 2+ injuries. The average number of injuries per athlete increased from 0 to 2(+) concussions. Concussion is a commonly reported injury. Upper extremity injury is identified as having the strongest association with concussion risk in the equestrian athlete. Knowing UE injury status could be useful in gaging the risk and odds of concussion in equestrian athletes.

(more…)
2020-01-31T09:20:28-06:00February 7th, 2020|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Concussion in the Collegiate Equestrian Athlete

The Workplace Experiences of Athletic Trainers in the Professional Sports Setting

Authors:

Katelyn A. Zweigle DAT, LAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: kzweigle@sycamores.indstate.edu

Stephanie M. Mazerolle Singe PhD, ATC, FNATA
Department of Kinesiology
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
E-mail: Stephanie.mazerolle@uconn.edu

Zachary K. Winkelmann PhD, SCAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: zwinkelmann@indstate.edu

Elizabeth R. Neil PhD, LAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: eneil@sycamores.indstate.edu

Nicholas J. Spangler DAT, LAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: nspangler@sycamores.indstate.edu

Lindsey E. Eberman PhD, LAT, ATC*
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: lindsey.eberman@indstate.edu

Corresponding Author:
Lindsey Eberman, PhD, LAT, ATC
Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
567 North 5th Street,
Terre Haute, IN 47809
E-mail: lindsey.eberman@indstate.edu
Phone: 812-237-3961

The Workplace Experiences of Athletic Trainers in the Professional Sports Setting

ABSTRACT:

Purpose: Previous literature has reported that athletic trainers in the professional sports setting (PSS) experience role strain from extreme organizational expectations and demands, resulting in perceived limitations in patient care and work-life balance.Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of athletic trainers working in the PSS.

Methods: We recruited 18 participants from various professional sports who partook in a semi-structured, one-on-one phone interview. A 3-person data analysis team used a multi-phased process to identify emerging domains and core ideas, ultimately developing a consensus codebook. Trustworthiness was established with member checking, multiple researcher triangulation, and external auditing.

Results: Three domains emerged: 1) job attractors, 2) feeling valued, and 3) characteristics of the workplace environment. Participants reported being attracted to athletic training in the PSS to work with elite athletes, because of supportive coworker relationships, having a network of athletic trainers, and increased access to resources and education. Athletic trainers reported feeling valued by employers through increasing professional responsibilities and increasing compensation or recognition.  They also reported having trusting relationships with their patients. Participants described mutual organizational and employee loyalty in their workplace environment. Participants detailed examples of inappropriate behaviors and a sub-culture of acceptance, whereby these workplace experiences were accepted as a byproduct of the PSS.  Participants discussed common coworker tensions related to miscommunication.  Although participants were overall positive about their workplace’s experiences, they acknowledged sacrifices to acquire and retain their positions, including significant time commitments, regular travel expectations, family compromises, and fewer opportunities for promotion.

Conclusion: Athletic trainers in the PSS feel valued for their work despite the long hours, family and promotional sacrifices. Positive coworker environments and access to resources continue to attract athletic trainers to the PSS. A sub-culture of accepting inappropriate workplace behavior within the PSS should be further explored. 

Application in Sport: Athletic trainers in the professional sports setting feel that they have added job attractors that may include access to resources and education. The professional sports setting may include a sub-culture of acceptance, where inappropriate behavior is overlooked as a result of the setting.  

(more…)
2020-01-28T10:40:48-06:00January 31st, 2020|Sports Medicine|Comments Off on The Workplace Experiences of Athletic Trainers in the Professional Sports Setting