Olympic Values Education Programme (OVEP) Progress Report: 2005-2010

### Introduction

In the process of organizing the Beijing Games, the Organizing Committee launched an Olympic education programme which touched such a number of young people that the record threatens to out-live generations of today’s youth. With schools across the nation participating, 400,000,000 young people partook of this programme to complete a daunting task that began just six years earlier, one year after Beijing was awarded the Games. While these numbers are staggering and the Olympic education programme was solely a national production, be it with great similarities to the IOC’s Olympic Values Education Programme (OVEP), it remains a fact that it has inspired a number of National Olympic Committees to dream of such a reach. Pro-rated, the percentages are achievable. Rwanda, with a population of just over 120,000,000 would, under this assumption, need to reach a youth population of around 3.5 million. The Indian Olympic Association is hoping its own start-up programme will touch around 20,000,000 young people through the inaugural Indian National Club Games and the ever popular Indian National Games.

This truncated progress report is meant to give some direction to the first-ever meeting of OVEP animators in Durban preceding the 7th World Conference on Sport, Education and Culture. The meeting is intended to generate discussion on the overall review and progress of the OVEP project. In view of the President of the IOC signing off to a four year extension of the programme, the participants to the meeting will be asked to contribute their thoughts and experiences in regard to the way forward. OVEP is not a Youth Olympic Games Culture and Education Programme (CEP). It is supposed to be a pre and post YOG supporting system for all youth, whether or not participants in the youth games.

The coming on board of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is an exciting dimension to OVEP. The organization’s idea of promoting the programme in its 9,000 Associated Schools Network (ASPnet) around the world to buttress values-based education bodes well for Olympism. UNESCO representatives are expected to share their experiences with participants during the meeting. Some developing countries are yet to establish ASPnet schools in their own countries.

In this report, three continents – Africa, Asia and Oceania – feature prominently as having been the successful test beds for the programme. Hopes are high that The Americans will have the programme up and running in 2011. Under the authority of the Pan-American Sports Organization (PASO) and the leadership of the Spanish Olympic Committee, OVEP is being launched in a large-scale way and will immediately be available as a standalone subject on the Spanish NOC’s virtual university. The project will also encompass Portuguese-speaking countries such as Brazil, Portugal and a number of developing countries in Africa.

The European charge is expected to be led by the International Pierre de Coubertin Committee (IPCC) which has done an impressive job of bringing together school children to a youth forum once every two years to dedicate their time to Olympic education. With the urging and material support of the IOC, IPCC has been widening its reach to include young people from other continents. Lately, young people from Asia, Africa and the Americas have participated in the biennial gatherings. OVEP will be an integral element in the established forum programme; however, OVEP as an undertaking in Europe will be driven by IPCC.

### Project Environment

#### Olympic Values Education

Taking into account the IOC’s social responsibility and with the focus on sport as a vehicle to deliver the message, OVEP was developed as a tool to further the IOC’s global youth strategy. The use of Olympic sport traditions and their inherent values is used as the backdrop for the IOC’s values-based teaching and learning opportunities. OVEP integrates sport and physical activity within a cultural and educational framework, and is in line with the United Nations General Assembly declaration of the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD – 2005-2014).

Safeguarding the needs of future generations, OVEP is a key component to the activities of the IOC and the Olympic Movement at large. In view of the fact, that in today’s world, the practice of sport has changed and with the objective to get the “Now Generation” back onto the field of play, this donor-supported project was launched in 2005 with the key objective as stated by the IOC President and approved by the Executive Board, “to develop an Olympic educational programme targeted primarily at young people and youth”.

The unique potential originating from the practice of sport has been repeatedly recognized. Progressive solutions to use the power of sport, its ability to initiate intercultural dialogue, its global reach, its effect on the sporting community and beyond represent an area to enhance equality, obtain personal freedom and a means for development.

However, as has been expressed by the IOC President, the delivery of a values-based education will depend on the joint efforts of all concerned; the sporting movement being a small part but a driving force within the larger playing field. In its contributions to the global platform of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), sport has a key role to play. Specifically, MDG objective Goal 2 (Achieve universal primary education) can be addressed in the framework of OVEP as the essential value of sport lends itself to quality education. That is to say that integration of sports activities can make school more appealing and increase learning motivation in youth.

The link between the IOC’s educational strategy in support of the DESD can be translated to:

– Making education more relevant and meaningful
– Building partnerships in support of sustainable development
– Developing skills both inside and outside the classroom
– Making teaching as well as learning a fun process

#### The Olympic Values Education Toolkit Resource

According to the Olympic Charter, “Olympism is a philosophy of life, exalting and combining in a balanced whole the qualities of body, will and mind. Blending sport with culture and education, Olympism seeks to create a way of life based on the joy of effort, the educational value of good examples and respect for universal fundamental ethical principles.”

Sport and the broader base of physical education provide a boundless arena from which to learn life skills such as tolerance, solidarity, fair play, non-discrimination, inclusivity, friendship, respect, excellence, dedication, loyalty and courage. Fundamental or universal virtues such as the value of effort and how to face life’s challenges such as victory or defeat are part and parcel of participation through and in sport.

The catalytic power of sport in uniting people for a common goal as well as the positive example it can provide to youth is the foundation from which the IOC embarked on the OVEP project. The resource, “Teaching Values, an Olympic Education Toolkit”, conceptualizes education and promotes the development of a values-based, life-long learning paradigm. The focus is on development of life skills and learning, that spreads beyond the sporting field or the four walls of the classroom encapsulated into the fabric of daily lives.

The OVEP project was built on the three pillars of: a teaching manual (a reference tool), an interactive database (network platform) and a label to encourage take-up (promoter of new initiatives). This report does not encompass the latter two components of the project, but strictly adheres to communicating information on the teaching manual and the implementation thereof.

#### The Five Educational Olympic Values

In November 2005, an IOC Education Expert Workshop reached a consensus on the objectives of OVEP, its constraints, deliverables and possible implementation strategies. During this ‘think tank’ event, it was agreed that the five educational values of the toolkit would be the pedagogical cornerstone and basis of the teaching resource:

Joy of effort – Young people develop and practice physical, behavioral and intellectual skills by challenging themselves and each other in physical activities, movement, games and sport.

Fair play – is a sports concept, but it is applied worldwide today in many different ways. Learning fair play behavior in sport can lead to the development and reinforcement of fair play behavior in the community and in life.

Respect for others – When young people who live in a multicultural world learn to accept and respect diversity and practice personal peaceful behavior, they promote peace and international understanding.

Pursuit of excellence – A focus on excellence can help young people to make positive, healthy choices, and strive to become the best that they can be in whatever they do.

Balance between body, will and mind – Learning takes place in the whole body, not just in the mind. Physical literacy and learning through movement contributes to the development of both moral and intellectual learning. This concept became the foundation of Pierre de Coubertin’s interest in a revival of the Olympic Games.

#### Summary of the OVEP Project Timeline

Year Action
2005 Decision by the IOC to develop a global youth strategy and address social responsibility through an educational values programme. IOC Education Expert Workshop reached a consensus on the objectives of OVEP, its constraints, deliverables and possible implementation strategies (Nov-Dec 2005). Sponsor-generated donation running over a 4 year period was presented to the IOC by ISM (2005).
2006 IOC President and EB approve OVEP project (Jan 2006). Teaching Values: An Olympic Education Toolkit was penned. The toolkit was presented at the 5th World Forum for Sport, Education and Culture (October 2006), was subsequently reviewed by the Culture and Education Working Group for Olympic Education and approved by the IOC Culture and Education Commission.
2007 Field testing started with the World Scout Jamboree Event in Chelmsford, UK (July-August 2007). Some 28,000 young people between the ages of 14 and 17 and 12,000 adults were present at this event.
Since 2008 Running of pilot phase, having successfully concluded 10 Train the Trainer Workshops with a geographical reach in 3 continents (Africa, Oceania and Asia).

### Projective Objectives

Having recognized the social and educational significance of sport, Olympic education reinforces the cultural DNA of individuals in a globalized world and further promotes the well-being of all using, among others, the tool of sport. With this fundamental principle in mind, it was agreed that the OVEP project would be initially established in developing countries in order to promote the application of Olympic values through sport.

To this effect, the following objectives were defined:

– **Objective 1:** Education – To design and implement an Olympic Education programme for children and young people in developing and developed countries in order to promote the application of Olympic values through sport.
– **Objective 2:** Multi-application – Heterogeneous applicability (e.g. multi-lingual, multi-cultural, actualization within different geo-political environments).
– **Objective 3:** Internal Collaboration – Compatible with IOC development programme policy in collaboration with other IOC departments (e.g. Olympic Solidarity, Olympic Museum, Sports Department).
– **Objective 4:** Global implementation – Evaluate the possibilities of extending OVEP into a global and general public promotional campaign following the pilot phase.

### Project Implementation

The pilot phase was built under the aegis of the “Train the Trainer” (TtT) model. The working concept underpinning the methodology was the “ripple or multiplier effect” in which the effective transfer of learning extends outward. That is to say that one person is trained in a group setting after which s/he takes that knowledge, skills and materials and confidently trains other groups. This formula was successfully implemented through 10 TtT workshops in 3 continents (Africa, Oceania and Asia) with a reach of approximately 45 countries. The latter does not take into account the integration of OVEP within Organizing Committees education programmes, national educational start-up initiatives, the OlympAfrica network and International Federations, to name a few.

### Review of Implementation from a Continental Perspective

A few outstanding facts to date:

– The OVEP project has trained over 300 delegates from approx. 45 countries so far.
– Relevant to Olympic Games special Olympic education programmes and OVEP reach was extended to 40,000 schools (Beijing 2008) and 2,100 British Columbia schools with 200,000 resource hits on the VANOC website platform (Vancouver 2010). The London Organizing Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) is also in full swing with their official launch of the London 2012 education programme, “Get Set”.

Following the inaugural launch of the programme in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania in 2008, the following highlights per continent can be reported.

#### Africa

– More than 155 countries have been targeted and subsequently activated.
– Over 100 trainers have been prepared to roll out the programme on a national level.
– Two regional workshops organized by the Department of International Cooperation and Development (DICD) in collaboration with OlympAfrica and hosted by the NOCs of Mali and Gambia have taken place. As a result, some NOCs have established a culture and Education Commission to further the activities on a national level.
– OlympAfrica Foundation is a valuable and key partner in disseminating and rolling-out OVEP. More than 250 activities are carried out in OlympicAfrica centres and OVEP is part of their offerings.
– The National Olympic Committee of Kenya has taken a lead interest in Olympic Values dissemination for the region and on a national level.
– The opening of the Olympic Youth Development Center in Zambia is a great boost to the programme. A cross cutting project in conjunction with United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) offers the perfect venue for the running of a Global Sports for Youth International Camp wherein OVEP modules have been integrated into the five day established programme. Six country delegations from Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia (host) with a total of 80 participating youths are scheduled to attend the camp in November 2010.
– Cross border implementation is a reality. This has been encouraged between the neighboring countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe between Tanzania and Kenya.
– Inroads at the policy decision making level (Ministries of Education) and the building of a sound national foundation have been made for example in Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and Uganda. Burundi will follow the same patter.
– Sensitization workshops (i.e. key to establishing a solid and sustainable foundation for programme roll-out) have been organized and incorporated in the framework for implementation in countries such as Zimbabwe, Kenya, Burundi and Egypt.

#### Asia

– The 5th World Forum on Sport, Education and Culture (Beijing, 2006) identified a network of 70 contacts in China to play a role in the outreach programme for OVEP. As illustrated during the 2008 Beijing Games, host countries of Olympic Games can and have played important roles as a channel of distribution for Olympic education.
– In view of the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games a TtT Workshop was initiated by the Singapore National Olympic Council in collaboration with the Singapore Olympic Academy (SOA). Thirteen countries were targeted and have been activated through the session. Since last December 2009, 116 trainers have been trained and are rolling out the programme on a national regional level.
– Large scale dissemination in highly populated countries such as India can be very effective from a case study and learning point-of-view. For example, the Delhi Public Schools (DPS) with a student intake of 10,000 students has been utilized for the “hands-on” practicum availed to the workshop participants during the IOC and Indian Olympic Association (IOA) TtT workshop which took place in March 2010. A key outcome has been smaller-scale initiatives on a rural grass roots level which have been conducted in regional provinces such as Raipur Chhattisgarh with the assistance of the provincial government. Also an integral approach led by an academic team from the Delhi university system with 8 adjoining states in the pipeline.
– A transversal project approach has been the result within the framework of activities by the Jordan Olympic Committee. The Higher Council for Youth Summer Camps along with the Amman Greater Municipality have concluded a series of peer-engaged clinics in June/July 2009. Moreover, the Education Division of the National Olympic Committee has been instrumental in securing the interest of the two principal universities of Jordan, the University of Jordan and the Hashemite University, with a view in mind to integrate Olympic values education into the institutions’ physical education curriculum.
– Malaysia has expressed an interest in taking on board the dissemination of OVEP. The results of a graduate student project conducted for the International Academy of Sports Science and Technology in Lausanne (AISTS) illustrated that in collaboration with the NOC and NOA, implementation of OVEP would be a welcome addition within the national educational system.
– The Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) has motioned their interest to take on a lead continental role for the OVEP project in the region in 2011-2012.

#### Oceania

– Fourteen countries were targeted and subsequently activated through the OVEP Continental Seminar (Fiji, July 2009). Thirty-two trainers were trained and prepared to roll out the programme on a national level.
– A legacy of the IOC promoted Continental seminar in 2009 was also the pending MOU between the IOC and the National Universities of South Pacific and the Fiji Institute of Technology to include OVEP within their curriculum.
– Key NOCs in this region such as Australia and New Zealand have a long tradition and inclusive approach as it relates to OV education within their classroom based activities and in the physical education curriculum. Both National Olympic Committees of Australia and New Zealand widely disperse resources and materials through web-based and interactive social media platforms, programmes that are designed to encourage youth to lead active, healthy and values based lifestyles. The New Zealand “Living the Olympic Values” is a popular series of digital and interactive teaching resource with a particular focus on general subjects such as English, Social Sciences and Physical Education. These resources are available for a global audience and for free download.
– Small island projects such as that initiated by the National Olympic Committee of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) resulted in a stellar example of a promising practice with the Young Educator Promoting Olympic Values (YEPOV) workshop following the Continental Seminar in Fiji. Key to the success of this project was the support of Olympic Solidarity (OS) Programmes in collaboration with the Department, and transfer of knowledge from a larger experienced NOC. Extended roll-out in other nearby islands has been achieved.
– The National Olympic Committee of Vanuatu has made progress in its efforts to ensure the inclusion of sport and physical education in the national school curriculum. The NOC has also been proactive in linking into opportunities such as the development of rowing in the region and from a coaching perspective investigating how OVEP would fit into an overall education project.

### Reflective findings

In general, OVEP has made great strides since its inception. There needs to be a continued focus on the explicit teaching of values, together with a continuation of embedding Olympic values principles combined with sports in the classroom, as well as in all out-reach areas and activities. This will result in the development and implementation of creative and innovative programmes that will add to the overall resources in the context of education for sustainable development.

#### Summary

Some general findings which have emerged are as follows:

##### Relevance and strategic fit:

– OVEP goes beyond geo-political and artificial boundaries and is a sustainable platform which can help to address gender inequality, social exclusion, economic challenges, risky behaviors, physical handicaps, among others.
– Notable respect for cultural diversity and educational systems is an integral driver of the programme. To allow regional efficacy OVEP should be prepared to adapt and allow for decision making in the specific region.
– This transfer of knowledge and sharing experiences and good practices among animators of the programme should be the cornerstone for the future of the programme.

##### Validity of programme design and methodology:

– The toolkit does provide a sound basis for implementation and roll-out. However, as identified in the manual, caution needs to be taken in respect to tailoring the activities and TtT workshops to the local and social contexts.

### Lessons Learned

– Availability of financial resources does not guarantee uptake of the programme. What does?
– Need to diversity channels of dissemination of OVEP. Programme must be available in a controlled environment on electronic platforms.
– Derivatives of the programme should be encouraged, for social, political and cultural reasons.
– Many NOCs are taking a passive interest in the programme, leaving the initiative to “others”. There is need for NOCs to take ownership of the programme at national level but still be able to work with other entities. The Olympic brand can only be protected in a given country by the NOC who have the absolute authority to control the Olympic symbols’ use by third parties.
– Mentoring the programme by which experienced trainers coach ‘rookies’ for feedback, problem-solving and strategic modeling needs to be established.
– The need to expand on key entry points (e.g. endorsement of ministries of sport and education, involvement of International Federations, relevant UN agencies).
– The partnership with UNESCO is crucial to the introduction of OVEP in the school curriculum. NOCs need to develop relationships with UNESCO National Commissions in their own countries. This relationship does not currently exist.
– OVEP does not have to be a stand-alone subject. Elements of OVEP can and should be integrated into other educational programmes in truncated forms. The IOA sessions are a perfect platform for delivering unbundled OVEP.
– The language barrier appears to be a strong deterrent in widening the reach of OVEP. Currently, it exists only in English and French. However, the World Taekwondo Federation and a few enterprising NOCs have translated the toolkit into locally-popular languages. This should be encouraged. While NOCs in developing countries might not have the resources for such undertakings, Olympic Solidarity and the Department of International Cooperation and Development have always been sympathetic to requests for resources to advance Olympic education in general and can be counted upon to help.

### Going Forward

In the period of 2005-2010, the OVEP project was launched, tested for its global applicability and fine-tuned where necessary. The report clearly shows that the activities undertaken thus far have brought the project objectives within reach. The pilot phase has successfully rolled out over three regions, while the number and variety of follow-up activities in these regions show that the seed has fallen on fertile ground.

By definition a pilot phase of a project looks at a defined concept on a limited scale. Upon completion, the concept is being evaluated, and budget parameters are being studied. The concept of “teaching life skills through interactive play” (i.e. OVEP) and using sport as a tool is a success story. Simultaneously, in order to reliably measure the progress and impact of the OVEP project, a standardized and repeatable monitoring and reporting system should be in place. This measuring system should be applicable from a central reference point such as the IOC, but also by local authorities.

To this effect, a concept feedback mechanism has been integrated during the IOC-UNESCO Associated Schools (ASPnet) Joint Initiative, “Teaching Olympic Values”. A draft proposal for discussion on further collaboration was brought to the table during a meeting of IOC and UNESCO in September 2010. UNESCO ASPnet tallies more than 9,000 schools in 180 countries.

At the moment, a future strategic outlook or orientation to extend the reach through new partnerships and alliances is being pursued.

In addition, the collaboration with international partner organizations has shown to be of key supplementary value to the programme. Now that the immediate future of the project has been secured from a budgetary perspective with an extension of the donor-generated support, the programme will be continued in existing areas, while new activity regions can and will be added.

Like all large projects in a pilot phase, the period 2005-2010 has highlighted some areas in which the successful programme can perform even better. The fact that all activities require a regional fine-tuning to increase the efficacy (from a socio-economic and political perspective) will bring an added value to the next project phase.

**Department of International Cooperation and Development**
4 December 2010
Durban, South Africa

### Acknowledgements

The compilation of this report would not have been possible without the knowledge base, support and contribution of our global network of OVEP trainers and educators in the broadest sense of the definition.

On behalf of the IOC, the Department of International Cooperation and Development applauds and thank you for your tireless efforts and continuing passion for Olympism.

### Annex A: OVEP Geographical Reach

The bold countries in the table below reflect TtT workshops. The remaining countries in the table were either present as participants or otherwise exposed to OVEP. The table is limited to OVEP related activities and does not take into account wider Olympic education initiatives carried out by the NOCs, Ifs or Recognized Organizations, to name a few.

Africa Asia Ocenia The Americas Europe
B. Faso
Ivory Coast
Egypt
Gambia
G. Bissau
Guinee
Libya
Mali
Niger Nigeria
Senegal
Sierra Leone
Tanzania
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Brunei
Cambodia
China
Chinese Tapei
India
Indonesia
Japan
Jordan
Mongolia
Myanmar
Oman
Phillippines
Singapore
South Korea
Thailand
American Samoa
Australia
Cook Islands
Fiji
FS Micronesia
Guam
Kiribati
Marshall Islands
Nauru
New Zealand
P. New Guinea
Palau
Samoa
Tonga
Canada (Vancouver 2010)
Carribbean (ASPnet Schools)
Great Britain (London 2012)

### Annex B: OVEP Country Implementation

#### Australia

##### Background

Olympic education and the Olympics have always stolen the hearts of the Australian population. The NOC education programmes and aims are implemented by using the Olympic sport traditions and values as the context for teaching life values and life skills. The promotion of the Olympic spirit and values to the wider community is performed through established education programs: (i) Live Clean Play Clean – delivered by young Olympians; (ii) Pierre de Coubertin Awards – open to all senior secondary school students across Australia and (iii) the A.S.P.I.R.E. school network.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Using the Olympic sport traditions and values as the context for teaching life values and skills.
2. Educating young athletes on the moral, ethical and physical reasons for not taking performance-enhancing drugs.
3. Through the Coubertin Awards, select students who demonstrate attributes of fair play and respect for others.
4. Involve the community and stakeholders (NOC, Ministry of Education, Universities, Youth Council, IOC and IFs).
5. A.S.P.I.R.E. School Network (ASN) founded on the Australian Olympic Team’s set of values, namely: attitude, sportsmanship, pride, individual responsibility, respect and express yourself, which is the Australian Olympic Committee’s national education program for primary educators designed to instill in young Australians an appreciation for the values, spirit and philosophy of the Olympic Movement. This comprehensive programme organizes Olympic related activities such as on-line video conferencing providing the opportunity for primary school children to talk with Olympians, Olympic Day Celebration, BK Zone – website for primary students containing fun, interactive educational activities themed around the Olympic Games and Olympic Village Art. Primary students are invited to decorate the Australian section of the Olympic Village (AOC) received over 2,000 pieces of artwork from 100 schools for the Beijing Games).

##### Project implementation:

1. Coubertin Awards: open to all senior students, 779 awarded in 2008.
2. Village Art – Students are invited to deliver a literature or artistic piece of work for the Olympic Games.
3. More than 24,500 ASPIRE teachers registered since 2006.
4. A.S.P.I.R.E. activities: Learn from a Champ, Chat to a Champ, Olympic Day and Village Art, BK Zone and Medallion.
5. Fit OVEP in with Higher Council for Youth activities.
6. Cross-curriculum lectures for primary teachers with focus on the upcoming Olympic Games.
7. On-line Olympic Resources emphasizing Olympic values, literacy and numeracy skills, information and communication technology, active lifestyles and community links.

##### Project follow-up:

As part of the AOC OVEP implementation plan, the toolkit will be distributed to schools participating in the Pierre de Coubertin Awards, State and Federal Departments of Education (8,000 schools and 14,850 teachers registered) and State Olympic Councils (7 SOCs in total).

One of the key challenges pinpointed by the AOC for OVEP implementation is that there is no established uniform national curriculum in the country.

#### Federated States of Micronesia

##### Background

Keeping in mind the agreed commitment of the Regional Seminar in Fiji to prioritize youth empowerment and participation, the Young Educator Promoting Olympic Values (YEPOV) initiative was brought forward by the NOC. The objectives of the project are to: promote OV to Micronesia schools through the Junior Sport Program, increase the number of Micronesia youth interested in participating in sport, to train Micronesia youth and have them share the Olympic Movement with their peers, improve the quality of life of the youth of Micronesia.

Nineteen schools were targeted for this initiative and the project was launched in January 2010. Funding was obtained through the Olympic Solidarity World Programmes. This project is an example of good practices and joint collaboration of a larger experienced NOC lending a hand to one of her smaller counterparts.

##### OVEP workshop objectives:

1. Mentoring of young people, Education and Healthy Lifestyles.
2. Sharing experiences of the Youth Olympic Games.
3. The Role of the Olympic Movement.
4. A positive reinforcement of the Olympic Values and the value of sport.

##### Project implementation:

1. A selection of best students and teachers took place.
2. Endorsement by the participating schools.
3. OVEP objectives shared and incorporated with physical exercise.
4. Financial support received from Olympic Solidarity; material resource support received from the IOC Department of International Cooperation and Development.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Excellent teamwork in the organization of the workshop.
2. Students of Youth Camps and YOG gave presentations.
3. High level of satisfaction in participant evaluation.
4. Exposed schools are already implementing OVs in their programme.
5. Involved NOCs will assist students to follow-up on school activities.

##### Project recommendations:

1. Project will be continued at 2010 High School Track & Field Championships
2. Concept of Youth promoting OVs should be extended through other seminars.
3. The Women & Sport Committees in Oceania could organize such workshops.
4. ONOC to be involved in proposal for OV workshops with senior students.

#### India

##### Background

The introduction of the OVEP programme augured well with the Presidential launch in Pune (October 2008). In the early part of 2010, an IOC National “Train the Trainers” workshop comprised of 35 State Olympic Associations (28 states and 7 union territories) took place. The Delhi Public Schools (DPS) with a student intake of 10,000 was utilized for the “hands-on” practicum availed to the participants during the course of the workshop.

The NOC is committed to the OVEP programme and developing sport diversity at the grassroots level. It was agreed that OVEP would be part of the activities of the Indian National Club Games that will target 800,000 clubs in the country. Roll-out post workshop on a grassroots level is being implemented via the respective State Olympic Associations (SOAs).

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Update participants on OVEP and the Education Toolkit.
2. To offer the OVEP learning and teaching theories.
3. Discuss implementation of OVEP in schools, universities and sport organizations.
4. Create a platform of leaders in schools and communities.
5. Select coaches to instruct OVEP leaders.
6. Involve rural children by providing an opportunity for participation.

##### Project implementation:

1. Creation of a master list of students’ expectations for feedback purposes.
2. Curriculum theory and toolkit analysis.
3. Learning as an active and interactive process (English and Hindi).
4. Learning in group discussions, creative activities, simulations, writing skills.
5. OVEP implementation and concept given to teaching coaches.
6. Motivate coaches to spread the concept to a ‘second’ layer of teachers.
7. Motivate these teachers to involve youth in the learning concept.
8. Nine target areas have been selected for the project.
9. One year of preparation, three years of OVEP implementation.
10. Core OVEP group; Project Directors & Coordinator, (Master) Trainers, Teachers & School Administrators, Performing Artists, Film Makers, University Students & Sportspersons, NGO Volunteers.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Olympic Values: Theory, content and methodology comprehended by students.
2. Toolkit: structure and content comprehended by students.
3. Participation 28 students (teachers 4, professors 5, Parent Advisory Committee 1, NOC officials 4, Sport organizations 14).
4. Implementation of OVEP in educational, sport and youth groups settings.
5. Feedback on resources.
6. Extend OVEP to other countries.

##### Project recommendations:

1. To adapt lecture-oriented, textbook teachers to a programme of physical activity.
2. Practicality of the toolkit in a multi-faceted setting.
3. Establish networking with other global similar projects.
4. University involvement required now to increase the impact.

##### Project assessment:

1. Endless support of staff, IOC and NOC very valuable.
2. Engagement of participants in activities and exercises positive.
3. Flexibility in regard to programme required.
4. Transparency in ideas between participants very helpful.

#### New Zealand

##### Background

For a number of years, the New Zealand Olympic Committee (NZOC) in collaboration with the New Zealand Olympic Academy (NZOA) have been very active in producing educational resources targeted at primary/secondary school levels and inclusion of Olympic education as a classroom-based activity in physical education training curriculum. The Ministry of Education and other key agencies on a country level are involved in this educational context.

The NOC has recently put in place dedicated staff in the form of a full-time Olympic Educator (participant to OVEP Fiji Workshop). The NZOC and NZOA have started to incorporate OVEP into digital education resources for primary schools and at university level. Academic courses on Olympism are now available. IT resources are accessible for free, together with the OVEP manual; this educational process is being channeled through Lift Education, an educational publishing company. This approach is in line with the NZOC Strategic Plan 2010-2013.

##### OVEP project objectives 1 (OVEP incorporation in schools and universities):

1. To promote awareness, engagement and modeling of the educational values of Olympism in the NZL educational system.
2. Develop the Olympism education knowledge base in physical education, sport education and sport coaching.
3. Offer OVEP to the Oceania region as opportunities for teachers.
4. Set up a research culture on Olympism (integrating OVEP) at university level.

##### Project implementation:

1. Olympism and OVEP have been included into the university curriculum of physical education students (University of Canterbury).
2. The above-mentioned University has also integrated OVEP into the education programme for sport coaching.
3. Specific courses on Olympism, Education and Sport and PhD courses in Olympic Studies are in the picture.

##### Project outcomes:

1. The Regional Seminar held in Fiji has exposed many participants to OVEP.
2. Resources and lack of curriculum time form barriers for dissemination.
3. Recommendations were sent to relevant Ministries of Education.
4. Other regional universities have been contacted. At least 3 professional development sessions for physical education teachers took place with an exposure of 200 delegates.
5. University staff have participated in a number of conferences.
6. Platforms created with other academic institutions, funding still a bottleneck.
7. Centre for Olympic studies developed at university level in NZL.

##### Project Recommendations:

1. The initiatives developed in NZL need to spread further in Oceania.
2. ONOC solidarity funding yet not available.
3. For funding beyond NZL university budgets required.
4. Strong, well-resourced leadership for Oceania is required.

##### Project follow-up:

1. Refresher courses for trainers must be organized.
2. Duplication must be avoided by a standardized monitoring and evaluation system.
3. Resources must be secured by initiating corporate partnerships.
4. Majority of trainers follow up with conducting workshops.
5. Trainers must improve their coordination and expand networking.

##### OVEP project objectives 2 (Living the Olympic Values):

1. Target group: primary school students, age 8 – 12 years.
2. Offer interactive digital education resources to primary schools.
3. Tone and technology must be engaging to youth, with a link to English, Social Sciences, Health and Physical Education.
4. Development of a promotional web development plan, focus on awareness of and demand for OV based educational resources.

##### Project implementation:

1. IT Texts are available for free with accompanying teaching notes.
2. Information on Olympism, the NZL curriculum and Resources.
3. Available texts: Olympic Values, Olympic Games, Giving it Everything, Determined to Succeed.
4. Funding was secured through NZOC, NZOA and Olympic Solidarity.
5. Corporate sponsorship currently being sought.
6. A new Board of NZOA is being formed.

#### Singapore

##### Background

In view of the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games the Singapore National Olympic Council (SNOC) in collaboration with the National Olympic Academy (SOA) launched a training workshop directed to the theme of equipping and training educators for the Olympic Values Education Programme.

Under the banner of the 2009 SOA 16th Annual International Session for Young Participants, the Academy built a core group of Olympic Education champions in the Asian continent and Singapore. The Continental Association was on board and collaborated with the NOC in this initiative.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. To promote OVEP to NOCs and NOAs in the region.
2. To equip Olympic educators with knowledge and skills to deliver OVEP in their respective countries.
3. To develop a core group of Olympic Education Leaders, in view of the 2010 YOG in Singapore.

##### Project implementation:

1. Prior to Opening Ceremony a dialogue with 12 SIN Olympians was organized.
2. Olympic history and toolkit analysis.
3. Discussion in working groups on values such as peace, excellence, respect, teamwork, environment, etc.
4. Design of flags and the concept behind flag and ceremony symbolism.
5. Cultural presentations, local as well as international.
6. Simulations of the OG Opening Ceremony
7. An interactive Meet the Olympians’ session.
8. Sharing of national experiences on Olympic Education.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Very positive interaction between participants during workshop days.
2. Successful workshop as judged by the responding participants.
3. A total number of 116 participants with diverse representations.
4. Implementation of OVEP for children and youth appreciated by participants.

#### Tanzania

##### Background

Negotiations with the Ministry of Education to integrate OVEP on a national scale within the context of the school curriculum is hoped to be realized in the upcoming 2009/2010 academic year. The capital (Dar-es-Salaam) has a population of 4 million with a national population of 40+ million. Two workshops per year comprising 30 participants per session would have a high project impact taking into consideration the ripple effect. In order to empower youth, an OVEP Youth Ambassadors programme and the organization of a youth Olympic Festival is being developed by the OVEP Regional Coordinator.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Train 30 physical education leaders from Tanzania.
2. Train 30 physical education leaders from Zanzibar.
3. Create an Olympic Education and Leadership Youth Camp.

##### Project implementation:

1. OVEP presentations were given in schools and school revisits are underway.
2. Workshop on Olympic Values Education held for 30 Women Sports leaders.
3. OVEP presentation held during East African Women Sports Journalists Forum.
4. OVEP presentation given during IOA in Olympia (117 Directors of NOAs).
5. Two day session on volunteerism for 30 young students at TOC headquarters.
6. Training of 150 students on providing Volunteer services during the Queen’s Baton Relay.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Trained students will act as coordinators during Youth Camps.
2. Report author took part in IOA Masters Course.

##### Project follow-up:

1. A proposal was submitted and approved for OVEP training 30 Physical Education Teachers (Sep 2010).
2. A proposal was submitted and approved for the training of 30 Physical Education Teachers in Zanzibar (Nov 2010).
3. A proposal has been submitted to Olympic Solidarity for funding for an International Olympic Education and Leadership Youth Camp (Nov 2010).

#### Zambia

The programme has support from the Ministry of Education, UNICEP (London 2012 International Inspirational project), NOC of Zambia, Sport for Youth and Sport in Action. Plans to expand the program involve integration into sport federations’ junior nationals. Discussions to this effect with the Zambia Schools Sport Association have been successful and it is projected that in the proposed roll-out phase more than 1,000 teachers in 72 district sport associations and that all national (inter-provincial and inter-schools nationals) will benefit from Olympic Values education.

The first Olympic Youth Development Centre (OYDC) under the IOC’s Sport for Hope Programme was officially opened in May 2010. The multi-purpose sports complex is a great addition to the local population and will also enrich multi-cultural dialogue through the running of international youth camps such as the IOC-UNODC Global Sports Fund Youth Camp.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Develop an implementation structure for OVEP programs.
2. Integrate OVEP into Olympic and other national sport structures
3. Training of OVEP activity leaders.
4. Monitoring, evaluation and dissemination of good practices.

##### Project implementation 1 (Sensitization/engagement of stakeholders in OVEP):

To disseminate OVEP to 10 districts, 10,000 Youth & 100,000 Adults in 2010 by integration of OVEP into NOA, schools, sports clubs, NGOs.

##### Project outcomes 1:

Reach:

1. The NOA, 22 schools, 3 NGOs and 94 community youth teams have integrated OVEP into their educational programmes.
2. Implementation: 39 schools have made an OVEP implementation plan for 2010.

##### Project implementation 2 (training for sports teachers/coaches, peer leaders/coaches):

1. To equip 120 Teachers, 70 Coaches and 200 Peer Leaders with knowledge on integration of OVEP by training participants in 3 different levels of trainer skills.
2. To influence parents and teachers at targeted schools on their role in changing thought processes towards Olympic Values by holding quarterly forums in all selected schools on OVEP, the benefits for children, the role of parents and teachers, and the eventual conflict between OV versus cultural values.

##### Project outcomes 2:

1. 350 OVEP leaders have been trained to integrate life skills into games and sport and are conducting OVEP sessions now.
2. 400 Parents and Teachers were involved and provide a supportive environment; the children exposed testify positive changes in family environment.

##### Project implementation 3 (provide an OV platform through fun, learning and interaction):

1. To hold weekly OV sessions at schools and sport training sessions by OVEP leaders.
2. Organize group discussions/quizzes, also including children not-in-sport.
3. Organize OV skills ‘Challenge’ events for 400 children in 6 disciplines (football, basketball, traditional games, volleyball, netball, education quiz).

##### Project outcomes 3.

1. Children are enjoying the sport and experience a supportive environment, make friends, became healthier and active.
2. Children cope better with everyday life challenges, interact better with other communities.
3. Teachers are better motivated and have more interaction.
4. School managers encourage OVEP and the use of sport with a positive attitude.

##### Project implementation 4 (monitoring):

Progression of OVEP project and the response by target audience.

1. Response of children 6-18 years; involved vs. not involved.
2. Parent and Teacher involvement in implementation.
3. Policymaker involvement (school managers).

##### Project outcomes:

Results by observation and questionnaire:

1. Verbal expression improved in sport and day-to-day life.
2. Teachers state that OV input is easy to incorporate through sport, thereby building confidence in children.
3. Children more respectful in family situations and better motivated when tasks are asked from them.

#### Zimbabwe

##### Background

Much work at the policy decision making level and the building of a sound national foundation in respect to OVEP has been achieved. An environment conducive to OVEP implementation has been developed through joint collaboration with the NOC and Zimbabwe Olympic Academy (ZOA) via sensitization workshops. Proposals for further implementation involving cross border activities with Zimbabwe are also being looked into. In the planning it has been proposed that a series of Train the Trainer workshops be run with a projected outcome of 80 trainers trained.

The spreading of Olympism and Olympic Education through the teaching of Olympic Values is set to increase, as implementing agents are being identified in other Provinces for ZOA activities.

##### OVEP Project objectives:

1. Teaching Olympic Values in a socially acceptable manner.
2. Identify trainers from all provinces and institutional strategic leaders.
3. Trained participants to execute knowledge in their home provinces.
4. Monitoring, evaluation and dissemination of good practices.

##### Project implementation:

1. Train the Trainer Workshop:
a. With budgetary help of Olympic Solidarity, identification of participants in a national perspective.
b. Thirty participants selected in schools, communities and national associations, with help of provincial educators, local governments, Sport & Recreation Commission.
c. Workshop participants: 20 from provinces via Ministry (♂ & ♀), 4: welfare & sport officers, 4: National Sports Associations, 2: NOC & Sport & Recreation Commission.
d. Workshop took place on July 10-12, 2009, with interactive theory and practice lectures.

2. Enforcing the ZOA capacities:
a. A new ZOA Director was hired to incorporate the OVEP program and a new Board of ZOA is being formed.
b. Implementation of OVEP methodology in the school programme has been initiated.
c. Identification of corporate partners is required to cover budgetary gaps.

##### Project follow-up (Post Workshop):

1. Most Trainers trained conduct workshops, securing a roll-out
2. Resources remain a problem for further progress.
3. Trainers must improve their coordination and networking levels.
4. A continuing education after initial training is required.
5. Evaluation underlined the need to improve trainers’ knowledge on OVEP, to customize OVEP literature and to ensure monitoring and evaluation.
6. Timely submission of work plans needs to be enforced.

#### UNESCO

Associated Schools (ASPnet)

##### Background

An IOC-UNESCO Associated Schools (ASPnet) Joint Initiative was launched within the framework of “Teaching Olympic Values”. The sub-regional training workshop for ASPnet National Coordinators, teachers, youth leaders and curriculum specialists was hosted by the Trinidad and Tobago National Commission for UNESCO. ASPnet National Coordinators and teachers from six Caribbean countries of: Barbados, Grenada, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago were present.

The National Olympic Committee of Trinidad and Tobago also co-organized and participated to this pilot project event. The NOC’s Olympic education programme “Shape the Community” Sport Development Project underlining Olympic values education has been well underway since 2008 and has a reach of over 3,000 children within three surrounding communities.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. To promote Values Education at school level, with a focus on the 5 values presented in the OVEP toolkit.
2. To process the implementation of the OVEP toolkit through the ASPnet laboratory by conducting a school experiment in the Caribbean.
3. Organize ASPnet Teacher and Coordinator workshops with presentation of the toolkit and elaboration of impact assessment tools.
4. Presentation of an evaluation survey to assess the impact of values education in primary and secondary schools.

##### Workshop objectives:

1. Provide participants with the necessary knowledge on the structure and content of the OVEP toolkit.
2. Elaborate assessment tools for primary and secondary schools on the integration of Olympic values in the education programme.
3. To plan school experiments over the 2010-2011 school year.
4. Draft recommendations for adaptation of the OVEP kit in the Caribbean context.
5. Complete survey data to be conducted at the end of the experimentation phase.

##### Project implementation:

1. Participants: 30 from 6 Caribbean countries, 6 ASPnet coordinators, 19 ASPnet teachers and sport coaches, 1 curriculum planner, 1 university teacher coach, 2 UNESCO staff, 1 IOC staff, 1 NOC staff, 5 national UNESCO Commission.
2. Presentation of OVEP toolkit, with a focus on (i) Joy of effort, (ii) Respect, (iii) Fair Play, (iv) Pursuit of Excellence, (v) Balance between body, will and mind.
3. Elaboration of assessment tools for (i) practicing the activities proposed in the toolkit, (ii) suggesting new activities, (iii) monitoring by questionnaire.
4. Preparation of monitoring and planning.
5. Creating commitment for participation in 2010-2011 school experimentation.
6. Joint declaration of commitment.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Participants trained on structure and content of toolkit.
2. A final report was drafted by participants.
3. Joint declaration of commitment signed by all participants.
4. Global planning for OVEP experimentation 2010-2011 has been detailed.
5. First generation of assessment tools decided upon.
6. Suggestions made for roll-out in other Caribbean countries.
7. Data collection instruments have been fine-tuned.
8. Video material is ready.

##### Project recommendations:

1. To finalize assessment tools for pre- and post-experimentation with education planners, statisticians and elected teachers and ASPnet coordinators.
2. Carry out applied research on the current vales education in the 6 participating countries.
3. To pursue research on basic socio-economic facts in the region.
4. To post workshop outcomes on the ASPnet website.
5. To collect from participants data to establish a working and monitoring platform for the school experimentation.
6. To identify a valid study sample, in terms of participating classes and students.

### Annex B: OVEP Country Implementation

#### Australia

##### Background

Olympic education and the Olympics have always stolen the hearts of the Australian population. The NOC education programmes and aims are implemented by using the Olympic sport traditions and values as the context for teaching life values and life skills. The promotion of the Olympic spirit and values to the wider community is performed through established education programs: (i) Live Clean Play Clean – delivered by young Olympians; (ii) Pierre de Coubertin Awards – open to all senior secondary school students across Australia and (iii) the A.S.P.I.R.E. school network.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Using the Olympic sport traditions and values as the context for teaching life values and skills.
2. Educating young athletes on the moral, ethical and physical reasons for not taking performance-enhancing drugs.
3. Through the Coubertin Awards, select students who demonstrate attributes of fair play and respect for others.
4. Involve the community and stakeholders (NOC, Ministry of Education, Universities, Youth Council, IOC and IFs).
5. A.S.P.I.R.E. School Network (ASN) founded on the Australian Olympic Team’s set of values, namely: attitude, sportsmanship, pride, individual responsibility, respect and express yourself, which is the Australian Olympic Committee’s national education program for primary educators designed to instill in young Australians an appreciation for the values, spirit and philosophy of the Olympic Movement. This comprehensive programme organizes Olympic related activities such as on-line video conferencing providing the opportunity for primary school children to talk with Olympians, Olympic Day Celebration, BK Zone – website for primary students containing fun, interactive educational activities themed around the Olympic Games and Olympic Village Art. Primary students are invited to decorate the Australian section of the Olympic Village (AOC) received over 2,000 pieces of artwork from 100 schools for the Beijing Games).

##### Project implementation:

1. Coubertin Awards: open to all senior students, 779 awarded in 2008.
2. Village Art – Students are invited to deliver a literature or artistic piece of work for the Olympic Games.
3. More than 24,500 ASPIRE teachers registered since 2006.
4. A.S.P.I.R.E. activities: Learn from a Champ, Chat to a Champ, Olympic Day and Village Art, BK Zone and Medallion.
5. Fit OVEP in with Higher Council for Youth activities.
6. Cross-curriculum lectures for primary teachers with focus on the upcoming Olympic Games.
7. On-line Olympic Resources emphasizing Olympic values, literacy and numeracy skills, information and communication technology, active lifestyles and community links.

##### Project follow-up:

As part of the AOC OVEP implementation plan, the toolkit will be distributed to schools participating in the Pierre de Coubertin Awards, State and Federal Departments of Education (8,000 schools and 14,850 teachers registered) and State Olympic Councils (7 SOCs in total).

One of the key challenges pinpointed by the AOC for OVEP implementation is that there is no established uniform national curriculum in the country.

#### Federated States of Micronesia

##### Background

Keeping in mind the agreed commitment of the Regional Seminar in Fiji to prioritize youth empowerment and participation, the Young Educator Promoting Olympic Values (YEPOV) initiative was brought forward by the NOC. The objectives of the project are to: promote OV to Micronesia schools through the Junior Sport Program, increase the number of Micronesia youth interested in participating in sport, to train Micronesia youth and have them share the Olympic Movement with their peers, improve the quality of life of the youth of Micronesia.

Nineteen schools were targeted for this initiative and the project was launched in January 2010. Funding was obtained through the Olympic Solidarity World Programmes. This project is an example of good practices and joint collaboration of a larger experienced NOC lending a hand to one of her smaller counterparts.

##### OVEP workshop objectives:

1. Mentoring of young people, Education and Healthy Lifestyles.
2. Sharing experiences of the Youth Olympic Games.
3. The Role of the Olympic Movement.
4. A positive reinforcement of the Olympic Values and the value of sport.

##### Project implementation:

1. A selection of best students and teachers took place.
2. Endorsement by the participating schools.
3. OVEP objectives shared and incorporated with physical exercise.
4. Financial support received from Olympic Solidarity; material resource support received from the IOC Department of International Cooperation and Development.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Excellent teamwork in the organization of the workshop.
2. Students of Youth Camps and YOG gave presentations.
3. High level of satisfaction in participant evaluation.
4. Exposed schools are already implementing OVs in their programme.
5. Involved NOCs will assist students to follow-up on school activities.

##### Project recommendations:

1. Project will be continued at 2010 High School Track & Field Championships
2. Concept of Youth promoting OVs should be extended through other seminars.
3. The Women & Sport Committees in Oceania could organize such workshops.
4. ONOC to be involved in proposal for OV workshops with senior students.

#### India

##### Background

The introduction of the OVEP programme augured well with the Presidential launch in Pune (October 2008). In the early part of 2010, an IOC National “Train the Trainers” workshop comprised of 35 State Olympic Associations (28 states and 7 union territories) took place. The Delhi Public Schools (DPS) with a student intake of 10,000 was utilized for the “hands-on” practicum availed to the participants during the course of the workshop.

The NOC is committed to the OVEP programme and developing sport diversity at the grassroots level. It was agreed that OVEP would be part of the activities of the Indian National Club Games that will target 800,000 clubs in the country. Roll-out post workshop on a grassroots level is being implemented via the respective State Olympic Associations (SOAs).

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Update participants on OVEP and the Education Toolkit.
2. To offer the OVEP learning and teaching theories.
3. Discuss implementation of OVEP in schools, universities and sport organizations.
4. Create a platform of leaders in schools and communities.
5. Select coaches to instruct OVEP leaders.
6. Involve rural children by providing an opportunity for participation.

##### Project implementation:

1. Creation of a master list of students’ expectations for feedback purposes.
2. Curriculum theory and toolkit analysis.
3. Learning as an active and interactive process (English and Hindi).
4. Learning in group discussions, creative activities, simulations, writing skills.
5. OVEP implementation and concept given to teaching coaches.
6. Motivate coaches to spread the concept to a ‘second’ layer of teachers.
7. Motivate these teachers to involve youth in the learning concept.
8. Nine target areas have been selected for the project.
9. One year of preparation, three years of OVEP implementation.
10. Core OVEP group; Project Directors & Coordinator, (Master) Trainers, Teachers & School Administrators, Performing Artists, Film Makers, University Students & Sportspersons, NGO Volunteers.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Olympic Values: Theory, content and methodology comprehended by students.
2. Toolkit: structure and content comprehended by students.
3. Participation 28 students (teachers 4, professors 5, Parent Advisory Committee 1, NOC officials 4, Sport organizations 14).
4. Implementation of OVEP in educational, sport and youth groups settings.
5. Feedback on resources.
6. Extend OVEP to other countries.

##### Project recommendations:

1. To adapt lecture-oriented, textbook teachers to a programme of physical activity.
2. Practicality of the toolkit in a multi-faceted setting.
3. Establish networking with other global similar projects.
4. University involvement required now to increase the impact.

##### Project assessment:

1. Endless support of staff, IOC and NOC very valuable.
2. Engagement of participants in activities and exercises positive.
3. Flexibility in regard to programme required.
4. Transparency in ideas between participants very helpful.

#### New Zealand

##### Background

For a number of years, the New Zealand Olympic Committee (NZOC) in collaboration with the New Zealand Olympic Academy (NZOA) have been very active in producing educational resources targeted at primary/secondary school levels and inclusion of Olympic education as a classroom-based activity in physical education training curriculum. The Ministry of Education and other key agencies on a country level are involved in this educational context.

The NOC has recently put in place dedicated staff in the form of a full-time Olympic Educator (participant to OVEP Fiji Workshop). The NZOC and NZOA have started to incorporate OVEP into digital education resources for primary schools and at university level. Academic courses on Olympism are now available. IT resources are accessible for free, together with the OVEP manual; this educational process is being channeled through Lift Education, an educational publishing company. This approach is in line with the NZOC Strategic Plan 2010-2013.

##### OVEP project objectives 1 (OVEP incorporation in schools and universities):

1. To promote awareness, engagement and modeling of the educational values of Olympism in the NZL educational system.
2. Develop the Olympism education knowledge base in physical education, sport education and sport coaching.
3. Offer OVEP to the Oceania region as opportunities for teachers.
4. Set up a research culture on Olympism (integrating OVEP) at university level.

##### Project implementation:

1. Olympism and OVEP have been included into the university curriculum of physical education students (University of Canterbury).
2. The above-mentioned University has also integrated OVEP into the education programme for sport coaching.
3. Specific courses on Olympism, Education and Sport and PhD courses in Olympic Studies are in the picture.

##### Project outcomes:

1. The Regional Seminar held in Fiji has exposed many participants to OVEP.
2. Resources and lack of curriculum time form barriers for dissemination.
3. Recommendations were sent to relevant Ministries of Education.
4. Other regional universities have been contacted. At least 3 professional development sessions for physical education teachers took place with an exposure of 200 delegates.
5. University staff have participated in a number of conferences.
6. Platforms created with other academic institutions, funding still a bottleneck.
7. Centre for Olympic studies developed at university level in NZL.

##### Project Recommendations:

1. The initiatives developed in NZL need to spread further in Oceania.
2. ONOC solidarity funding yet not available.
3. For funding beyond NZL university budgets required.
4. Strong, well-resourced leadership for Oceania is required.

##### Project follow-up:

1. Refresher courses for trainers must be organized.
2. Duplication must be avoided by a standardized monitoring and evaluation system.
3. Resources must be secured by initiating corporate partnerships.
4. Majority of trainers follow up with conducting workshops.
5. Trainers must improve their coordination and expand networking.

##### OVEP project objectives 2 (Living the Olympic Values):

1. Target group: primary school students, age 8 – 12 years.
2. Offer interactive digital education resources to primary schools.
3. Tone and technology must be engaging to youth, with a link to English, Social Sciences, Health and Physical Education.
4. Development of a promotional web development plan, focus on awareness of and demand for OV based educational resources.

##### Project implementation:

1. IT Texts are available for free with accompanying teaching notes.
2. Information on Olympism, the NZL curriculum and Resources.
3. Available texts: Olympic Values, Olympic Games, Giving it Everything, Determined to Succeed.
4. Funding was secured through NZOC, NZOA and Olympic Solidarity.
5. Corporate sponsorship currently being sought.
6. A new Board of NZOA is being formed.

#### Singapore

##### Background

In view of the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games the Singapore National Olympic Council (SNOC) in collaboration with the National Olympic Academy (SOA) launched a training workshop directed to the theme of equipping and training educators for the Olympic Values Education Programme.

Under the banner of the 2009 SOA 16th Annual International Session for Young Participants, the Academy built a core group of Olympic Education champions in the Asian continent and Singapore. The Continental Association was on board and collaborated with the NOC in this initiative.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. To promote OVEP to NOCs and NOAs in the region.
2. To equip Olympic educators with knowledge and skills to deliver OVEP in their respective countries.
3. To develop a core group of Olympic Education Leaders, in view of the 2010 YOG in Singapore.

##### Project implementation:

1. Prior to Opening Ceremony a dialogue with 12 SIN Olympians was organized.
2. Olympic history and toolkit analysis.
3. Discussion in working groups on values such as peace, excellence, respect, teamwork, environment, etc.
4. Design of flags and the concept behind flag and ceremony symbolism.
5. Cultural presentations, local as well as international.
6. Simulations of the OG Opening Ceremony
7. An interactive Meet the Olympians’ session.
8. Sharing of national experiences on Olympic Education.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Very positive interaction between participants during workshop days.
2. Successful workshop as judged by the responding participants.
3. A total number of 116 participants with diverse representations.
4. Implementation of OVEP for children and youth appreciated by participants.

#### Tanzania

##### Background

Negotiations with the Ministry of Education to integrate OVEP on a national scale within the context of the school curriculum is hoped to be realized in the upcoming 2009/2010 academic year. The capital (Dar-es-Salaam) has a population of 4 million with a national population of 40+ million. Two workshops per year comprising 30 participants per session would have a high project impact taking into consideration the ripple effect. In order to empower youth, an OVEP Youth Ambassadors programme and the organization of a youth Olympic Festival is being developed by the OVEP Regional Coordinator.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Train 30 physical education leaders from Tanzania.
2. Train 30 physical education leaders from Zanzibar.
3. Create an Olympic Education and Leadership Youth Camp.

##### Project implementation:

1. OVEP presentations were given in schools and school revisits are underway.
2. Workshop on Olympic Values Education held for 30 Women Sports leaders.
3. OVEP presentation held during East African Women Sports Journalists Forum.
4. OVEP presentation given during IOA in Olympia (117 Directors of NOAs).
5. Two day session on volunteerism for 30 young students at TOC headquarters.
6. Training of 150 students on providing Volunteer services during the Queen’s Baton Relay.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Trained students will act as coordinators during Youth Camps.
2. Report author took part in IOA Masters Course.

##### Project follow-up:

1. A proposal was submitted and approved for OVEP training 30 Physical Education Teachers (Sep 2010).
2. A proposal was submitted and approved for the training of 30 Physical Education Teachers in Zanzibar (Nov 2010).
3. A proposal has been submitted to Olympic Solidarity for funding for an International Olympic Education and Leadership Youth Camp (Nov 2010).

#### Zambia

The programme has support from the Ministry of Education, UNICEP (London 2012 International Inspirational project), NOC of Zambia, Sport for Youth and Sport in Action. Plans to expand the program involve integration into sport federations’ junior nationals. Discussions to this effect with the Zambia Schools Sport Association have been successful and it is projected that in the proposed roll-out phase more than 1,000 teachers in 72 district sport associations and that all national (inter-provincial and inter-schools nationals) will benefit from Olympic Values education.

The first Olympic Youth Development Centre (OYDC) under the IOC’s Sport for Hope Programme was officially opened in May 2010. The multi-purpose sports complex is a great addition to the local population and will also enrich multi-cultural dialogue through the running of international youth camps such as the IOC-UNODC Global Sports Fund Youth Camp.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. Develop an implementation structure for OVEP programs.
2. Integrate OVEP into Olympic and other national sport structures
3. Training of OVEP activity leaders.
4. Monitoring, evaluation and dissemination of good practices.

##### Project implementation 1 (Sensitization/engagement of stakeholders in OVEP):

To disseminate OVEP to 10 districts, 10,000 Youth & 100,000 Adults in 2010 by integration of OVEP into NOA, schools, sports clubs, NGOs.

##### Project outcomes 1:

Reach:

1. The NOA, 22 schools, 3 NGOs and 94 community youth teams have integrated OVEP into their educational programmes.
2. Implementation: 39 schools have made an OVEP implementation plan for 2010.

##### Project implementation 2 (training for sports teachers/coaches, peer leaders/coaches):

1. To equip 120 Teachers, 70 Coaches and 200 Peer Leaders with knowledge on integration of OVEP by training participants in 3 different levels of trainer skills.
2. To influence parents and teachers at targeted schools on their role in changing thought processes towards Olympic Values by holding quarterly forums in all selected schools on OVEP, the benefits for children, the role of parents and teachers, and the eventual conflict between OV versus cultural values.

##### Project outcomes 2:

1. 350 OVEP leaders have been trained to integrate life skills into games and sport and are conducting OVEP sessions now.
2. 400 Parents and Teachers were involved and provide a supportive environment; the children exposed testify positive changes in family environment.

##### Project implementation 3 (provide an OV platform through fun, learning and interaction):

1. To hold weekly OV sessions at schools and sport training sessions by OVEP leaders.
2. Organize group discussions/quizzes, also including children not-in-sport.
3. Organize OV skills ‘Challenge’ events for 400 children in 6 disciplines (football, basketball, traditional games, volleyball, netball, education quiz).

##### Project outcomes 3.

1. Children are enjoying the sport and experience a supportive environment, make friends, became healthier and active.
2. Children cope better with everyday life challenges, interact better with other communities.
3. Teachers are better motivated and have more interaction.
4. School managers encourage OVEP and the use of sport with a positive attitude.

##### Project implementation 4 (monitoring):

Progression of OVEP project and the response by target audience.

1. Response of children 6-18 years; involved vs. not involved.
2. Parent and Teacher involvement in implementation.
3. Policymaker involvement (school managers).

##### Project outcomes:

Results by observation and questionnaire:

1. Verbal expression improved in sport and day-to-day life.
2. Teachers state that OV input is easy to incorporate through sport, thereby building confidence in children.
3. Children more respectful in family situations and better motivated when tasks are asked from them.

#### Zimbabwe

##### Background

Much work at the policy decision making level and the building of a sound national foundation in respect to OVEP has been achieved. An environment conducive to OVEP implementation has been developed through joint collaboration with the NOC and Zimbabwe Olympic Academy (ZOA) via sensitization workshops. Proposals for further implementation involving cross border activities with Zimbabwe are also being looked into. In the planning it has been proposed that a series of Train the Trainer workshops be run with a projected outcome of 80 trainers trained.

The spreading of Olympism and Olympic Education through the teaching of Olympic Values is set to increase, as implementing agents are being identified in other Provinces for ZOA activities.

##### OVEP Project objectives:

1. Teaching Olympic Values in a socially acceptable manner.
2. Identify trainers from all provinces and institutional strategic leaders.
3. Trained participants to execute knowledge in their home provinces.
4. Monitoring, evaluation and dissemination of good practices.

##### Project implementation:

1. Train the Trainer Workshop:
a. With budgetary help of Olympic Solidarity, identification of participants in a national perspective.
b. Thirty participants selected in schools, communities and national associations, with help of provincial educators, local governments, Sport & Recreation Commission.
c. Workshop participants: 20 from provinces via Ministry (♂ & ♀), 4: welfare & sport officers, 4: National Sports Associations, 2: NOC & Sport & Recreation Commission.
d. Workshop took place on July 10-12, 2009, with interactive theory and practice lectures.

2. Enforcing the ZOA capacities:
a. A new ZOA Director was hired to incorporate the OVEP program and a new Board of ZOA is being formed.
b. Implementation of OVEP methodology in the school programme has been initiated.
c. Identification of corporate partners is required to cover budgetary gaps.

##### Project follow-up (Post Workshop):

1. Most Trainers trained conduct workshops, securing a roll-out
2. Resources remain a problem for further progress.
3. Trainers must improve their coordination and networking levels.
4. A continuing education after initial training is required.
5. Evaluation underlined the need to improve trainers’ knowledge on OVEP, to customize OVEP literature and to ensure monitoring and evaluation.
6. Timely submission of work plans needs to be enforced.

#### UNESCO

Associated Schools (ASPnet)

##### Background

An IOC-UNESCO Associated Schools (ASPnet) Joint Initiative was launched within the framework of “Teaching Olympic Values”. The sub-regional training workshop for ASPnet National Coordinators, teachers, youth leaders and curriculum specialists was hosted by the Trinidad and Tobago National Commission for UNESCO. ASPnet National Coordinators and teachers from six Caribbean countries of: Barbados, Grenada, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago were present.

The National Olympic Committee of Trinidad and Tobago also co-organized and participated to this pilot project event. The NOC’s Olympic education programme “Shape the Community” Sport Development Project underlining Olympic values education has been well underway since 2008 and has a reach of over 3,000 children within three surrounding communities.

##### OVEP project objectives:

1. To promote Values Education at school level, with a focus on the 5 values presented in the OVEP toolkit.
2. To process the implementation of the OVEP toolkit through the ASPnet laboratory by conducting a school experiment in the Caribbean.
3. Organize ASPnet Teacher and Coordinator workshops with presentation of the toolkit and elaboration of impact assessment tools.
4. Presentation of an evaluation survey to assess the impact of values education in primary and secondary schools.

##### Workshop objectives:

1. Provide participants with the necessary knowledge on the structure and content of the OVEP toolkit.
2. Elaborate assessment tools for primary and secondary schools on the integration of Olympic values in the education programme.
3. To plan school experiments over the 2010-2011 school year.
4. Draft recommendations for adaptation of the OVEP kit in the Caribbean context.
5. Complete survey data to be conducted at the end of the experimentation phase.

##### Project implementation:

1. Participants: 30 from 6 Caribbean countries, 6 ASPnet coordinators, 19 ASPnet teachers and sport coaches, 1 curriculum planner, 1 university teacher coach, 2 UNESCO staff, 1 IOC staff, 1 NOC staff, 5 national UNESCO Commission.
2. Presentation of OVEP toolkit, with a focus on (i) Joy of effort, (ii) Respect, (iii) Fair Play, (iv) Pursuit of Excellence, (v) Balance between body, will and mind.
3. Elaboration of assessment tools for (i) practicing the activities proposed in the toolkit, (ii) suggesting new activities, (iii) monitoring by questionnaire.
4. Preparation of monitoring and planning.
5. Creating commitment for participation in 2010-2011 school experimentation.
6. Joint declaration of commitment.

##### Project outcomes:

1. Participants trained on structure and content of toolkit.
2. A final report was drafted by participants.
3. Joint declaration of commitment signed by all participants.
4. Global planning for OVEP experimentation 2010-2011 has been detailed.
5. First generation of assessment tools decided upon.
6. Suggestions made for roll-out in other Caribbean countries.
7. Data collection instruments have been fine-tuned.
8. Video material is ready.

##### Project recommendations:

1. To finalize assessment tools for pre- and post-experimentation with education planners, statisticians and elected teachers and ASPnet coordinators.
2. Carry out applied research on the current vales education in the 6 participating countries.
3. To pursue research on basic socio-economic facts in the region.
4. To post workshop outcomes on the ASPnet website.
5. To collect from participants data to establish a working and monitoring platform for the school experimentation.
6. To identify a valid study sample, in terms of participating classes and students.


-Download Olympic Values Education Programme (OVEP) Progress Report: 2005-2010 as PDF-