Latest Articles

Disordered Eating and Compulsive Exercise in Collegiate Athletes: Applications for Sport and Research

February 14th, 2020|Sports Health & Fitness|

Authors: Ksenia Power, M.S., Sara Kovacs, Ph.D., Lois Butcher-Poffley, Ph.D., Jingwei Wu, Ph.D., and David Sarwer, Ph.D.

Corresponding Author:
Ksenia Power, PhD Candidate
1800 N. Broad Street, Pearson Hall, 242
Philadelphia PA, 19122
tug82764@temple.edu
267-766-8938

Ksenia Power is a Doctoral Candidate and an Instructor of Record in the Department of Kinesiology at Temple University, majoring in Psychology of Human Movement.  She is also a Volunteer Assistant Women’s Tennis Coach at Temple University.

Disordered Eating and Compulsive Exercise in Collegiate Athletes: Applications for Sport and Research

ABSTRACT

Over the last three decades, a large body of research has examined the issue of eating disorders, both formal diagnoses and subclinical features, as well as compensatory behaviors in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. In general, this literature suggests that large numbers of student-athletes engage in disordered eating and compensatory behaviors; smaller percentages have symptoms that reach the threshold of formal diagnoses. Increased symptoms are associated with reduced athletic and academic performance, both of which may impact psychosocial functioning later in adulthood. Unfortunately, a number of methodological shortcomings across this body of research (e.g., studies with insufficient sample sizes, inappropriate comparison groups, and suboptimal or biased psychometric measures) limit the confidence that can be placed in these findings, underscoring the need for a new generation of studies. This paper provides an overview of this literature, focusing on issues of gender differences, sport type, and age. It also highlights the relationship between disordered eating and compulsive exercise, a compensatory behavior that is highly prevalent among collegiate athletes.  The health and athletic performance consequences of eating disorders in conjunction with compulsive exercise are also discussed.  In addition, a focus on more recently recognized eating disorders, such as binge eating disorder and the night eating syndrome is underscored.  Future work in this area needs to include the most methodologically rigorous measures available in order to aid most appropriately coaches and athletic trainers in promptly identifying at-risk athletes and to inform future prevention and treatment efforts.

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Concussion in the Collegiate Equestrian Athlete

February 7th, 2020|Research, Sports Medicine|

Authors: Tasneem Zahira PhD,  Timothy Henry PhD ATC, Michael L. Pilato MS ATC

Corresponding Author:
Michael L. Pilato MS ATC
1000 East Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14623
mikep316@yahoo.com
585-329-6463

Michael L. Pilato is an athletic trainer with Monroe Community College in Rochester, N.Y. He has been researching sports medicine for the equestrian athlete since 2003 and has been published in peer and non-peer reviewed journals.

Tasneem Zaihra PhD.
Department of Mathematics State University New York College at Brockport
350 New Campus Dr, Brockport, NY 14420
tzahira@brockport.edu
585-3952075

Tasneem Zaihra is an assistant professor of statistics in the department of mathematics, SUNY Brockport. She has many presentations and publications in peer-reviewed journals, to her credit.

Timothy Henry PhD. ATC
Department of HPERD State University New York College at Brockport
350 New Campus Dr, Brockport, NY 14420
thenry@borckport.edu
585-395-5357

Timothy Henry is director of the athletic training program at SUNY Brockport. He is also a reviewer for The Journal of Sport Rehabilitation and The Journal of Athletic Training.

Concussion in the Collegiate Equestrian Athlete

ABSTRACT

Equestrian sports, in general, pose a significant risk of concussion. Minimizing the risk of concussion has been a focal point in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to describe concussion and explore potential association(s) between groups of musculoskeletal injuries and Body Mass Index (BMI) on the risk and odds of concussion in the collegiate equestrian athlete. Forty-three schools, ranging from DI to DIII, from the Eastern United States were selected from the NCAA and Intercollegiate Horse Show Association’s websites. Self-reported injury and demographic data was collected through an online survey created in Mach Forms. Seventy-three participants completed the online survey (women n=71, men=2). Aggregate descriptive data is reported on all subjects. After removing data on 2 men, and a single female with incomplete data, the data from 70 females with complete data was analyzed using chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests and ordinal logistic regression. Pearson’s chi-squared as well as Fisher’s exact test (p-value =.0288 and.0297 respectively) indicates the risk of having concussion with 0 UE injury is not the same as with 1 or 2+ injuries. The average number of injuries per athlete increased from 0 to 2(+) concussions. Concussion is a commonly reported injury. Upper extremity injury is identified as having the strongest association with concussion risk in the equestrian athlete. Knowing UE injury status could be useful in gaging the risk and odds of concussion in equestrian athletes.

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The Workplace Experiences of Athletic Trainers in the Professional Sports Setting

January 31st, 2020|Sports Medicine|

Authors:

Katelyn A. Zweigle DAT, LAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: kzweigle@sycamores.indstate.edu

Stephanie M. Mazerolle Singe PhD, ATC, FNATA
Department of Kinesiology
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
E-mail: Stephanie.mazerolle@uconn.edu

Zachary K. Winkelmann PhD, SCAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: zwinkelmann@indstate.edu

Elizabeth R. Neil PhD, LAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: eneil@sycamores.indstate.edu

Nicholas J. Spangler DAT, LAT, ATC
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: nspangler@sycamores.indstate.edu

Lindsey E. Eberman PhD, LAT, ATC*
Neuromechanics, Interventions, and Continuing Education Research (NICER) Laboratory Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
Terre Haute, IN
E-mail: lindsey.eberman@indstate.edu

Corresponding Author:
Lindsey Eberman, PhD, LAT, ATC
Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation
Indiana State University
567 North 5th Street,
Terre Haute, IN 47809
E-mail: lindsey.eberman@indstate.edu
Phone: 812-237-3961

The Workplace Experiences of Athletic Trainers in the Professional Sports Setting

ABSTRACT:

Purpose: Previous literature has reported that athletic trainers in the professional sports setting (PSS) experience role strain from extreme organizational expectations and demands, resulting in perceived limitations in patient care and work-life balance.Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of athletic trainers working in the PSS.

Methods: We recruited 18 participants from various professional sports who partook in a semi-structured, one-on-one phone interview. A 3-person data analysis team used a multi-phased process to identify emerging domains and core ideas, ultimately developing a consensus codebook. Trustworthiness was established with member checking, multiple researcher triangulation, and external auditing.

Results: Three domains emerged: 1) job attractors, 2) feeling valued, and 3) characteristics of the workplace environment. Participants reported being attracted to athletic training in the PSS to work with elite athletes, because of supportive coworker relationships, having a network of athletic trainers, and increased access to resources and education. Athletic trainers reported feeling valued by employers through increasing professional responsibilities and increasing compensation or recognition.  They also reported having trusting relationships with their patients. Participants described mutual organizational and employee loyalty in their workplace environment. Participants detailed examples of inappropriate behaviors and a sub-culture of acceptance, whereby these workplace experiences were accepted as a byproduct of the PSS.  Participants discussed common coworker tensions related to miscommunication.  Although participants were overall positive about their workplace’s experiences, they acknowledged sacrifices to acquire and retain their positions, including significant time commitments, regular travel expectations, family compromises, and fewer opportunities for promotion.

Conclusion: Athletic trainers in the PSS feel valued for their work despite the long hours, family and promotional sacrifices. Positive coworker environments and access to resources continue to attract athletic trainers to the PSS. A sub-culture of accepting inappropriate workplace behavior within the PSS should be further explored. 

Application in Sport: Athletic trainers in the professional sports setting feel that they have added job attractors that may include access to resources and education. The professional sports setting may include a sub-culture of acceptance, where inappropriate behavior is overlooked as a result of the setting.  

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NCAA Realignment: Impact upon University ‘Olympic’ Sports

January 24th, 2020|Sports Coaching, Sports Management|

Authors: Stephen W. Litvin, Crystal Lindner and Jillian Wilkie

Corresponding Author:
Stephen W. Litvin, DBA
Professor, School of Business
College of Charleston
66 George Street
Charleston, South Carolina 29424
litvins@cofc.edu
843-953-7317

Stephen Litvin is a professor in the School of Business of the College of Charleston.  Crystal Lindner and Jillian Wilkie are students at the College of Charleston and Research Assistants within the School’s Office of Tourism Analysis.

NCAA Realignment: Impact upon University ‘Olympic’ Sports

ABSTRACT

Conference realignment has in recent years led to a “case of intercollegiate musical chairs” (2, p. 254). This research paper looks at the issue from a new perspective.  While past research has almost exclusively focused on football, this research considers the impact that affiliation change has upon universities’ non-football sports.  The findings suggest the move has been challenging for these teams.

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Ancient Olympic Superstars and the Remarkable Skills They Could Teach Today’s Athletes

January 17th, 2020|Research, Sports Studies and Sports Psychology|

Authors: Raymond Stefani

Corresponding Author:
Raymond Stefani
25032 Via Del Rio
Lake Forest, CA 92630
Raystefani@aol.com
949-586-1823

Dr. Raymond Stefani is a professor emeritus of the California State University, Long Beach with over 160 publications covering individual sports, team sports and sports history

Ancient Olympic Superstars and the Remarkable Skills They Could Teach Today’s Athletes

ABSTRACT

A data base of Ancient Olympic events was exhaustively researched by the Perseus Project and combined into one table by Wikipedia, containing nearly 900 results. The Wikipedia table was sorted to obtain the distribution of events and to identify the most successful Olympians of Ancient Greece. From 776 BC through 277 AD, just 30 events were contested, eight of which were offered only once. An average of only 3.5 events were contested in each Olympics. Of the five sports, track and field (called athletics internationally) comprised 49% of all contested events with the 200 m stadion sprint, comprising 30% of all contested events. Competition was so highly focused that winning once was very difficult and winning repeatedly was remarkable. From the sorted winners, 12 superstars of antiquity are chosen for discussion. These superstars include the most unlikely winner in that men’s Olympics, a woman, Kyniska of Sparta, who became a double winner by owning and training the horses that won two chariot races. Leonides of Rhodes won all three of the major running events four times successively, for 12 individual wins, not exceeded until 2016 by Michael Phelps. Herodoros of Megara won the trumpeter’s competition nine consecutive times. Two wrestlers won the boy’s event followed later by five successive wins in the open competition. The emperor Nero of Rome won six times, showing venerability by acting and playing the lyre in public. The pentathlete Phayllos of Kroton outfitted and commanded a battleship at the 480 BC Battle of Salamis, helping Greece defeat Persia. One of the few recorded measurements of Ancient Greece, his long jump of 55 feet has been nearly duplicated by five successive standing long jumps, each employing a re-invented strategy for jumping with weights in each hand. The remarkable skills of those 12 may serve as inspirations for today’s athletes.

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