Positive and Negative Events Predict Burnout and Engagement in Athletes and Non-Athletes

Authors: Donna Webster Nelson, Merry J. Sleigh, & Alyssa M. Nelson

Corresponding Author:
Donna Webster Nelson, Ph.D.
801 Oakland Avenue
Rock Hill SC, 29733
nelsond@winthrop.edu
803-323-2636

Positive and Negative Events Predict Burnout and Engagement in Athletes and Non-Athletes

ABSTRACT

The researchers compared predictors of engagement and burnout in adolescent athletes and non-athletes by focusing on daily positive and negative performance-related events (e.g., performing well in team practice) and interpersonal events (e.g., sharing a laugh with teammates). Participants were recent high school graduates who retrospectively reported participation in high school sports or heavy investment in alternate activities (e.g., marching band). The athletes and non-athletes were similar in how many hours they practiced and competed each week, frequency of activity-related travel, and performance level. In addition, the two groups did not differ in the extent to which their high school identity and self-esteem were based on their participation. Results revealed no overall differences between the two groups on engagement or burnout. For both groups, positive performance events predicted activity engagement (characterized by dedication, vigor and enthusiasm).  However, the experiences of athletes versus non-athletes differentially predicted burnout (marked by emotional and physical exhaustion). In athletes, burnout related to both performance and interpersonal events. In non-athletes, burnout was only related to performance events. In addition, burnout was positively associated with coach focus on winning (a situation more common for athletes) and negatively associated with coach focus on fun (a situation more common for non-athletes). These findings indicate that experiencing positive and negative events is a precursor for engagement and burnout in high school athletes and non-athletes. Promoting positive (relative to negative) events during training, practice, competitions or performances could enhance benefits and prevent maladaptive outcomes of participation in extracurricular activities. Positive social interactions may be particularly important for preventing burnout in adolescent athletes.

(more…)
2019-03-01T09:13:45-05:00March 1st, 2019|Research, Sports Studies and Sports Psychology|Comments Off on Positive and Negative Events Predict Burnout and Engagement in Athletes and Non-Athletes

Assessing the Dietary Quality and Health Status among Division 1 College Athletes at Moderate Altitude

Authors: Jay T. Sutliffe, Julia C. Gardner, Jenny M. Gormley, Mary Jo. Carnot, and Alison Adams

Corresponding Author:
Jay Sutliffe, PhD, RD
PO Box 15095
Flagstaff AZ, 86011
Jay.sutliffe@nau.edu
928-523-7596

Jay T. Sutliffe is Associate Professor of Nutrition and Foods and the Director of the PRANDIAL Lab at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, AZ; Julia C. Gardner is a research coordinator with the PRANDIAL Lab at Northern Arizona University; Mary Jo Carnot is professor of Counseling, Psychological Sciences, and Social Work at Chadron State College in Chadron, NE.; Jenny M. Gormley is a research assistant and student at Northern Arizona University; Alison Adams, is Professor of Biology at Northern Arizona University.

Assessing the Dietary Quality and Health Status Among Division 1 College Athletes at Moderate Altitude

ABSTRACT

Student-athletes’ dietary habits are ingrained in a complex interaction as they seek to maintain the balance between student and athlete. Assessing the dietary habits and lifestyle factors associated with this highly demanding population is the focus of this study. Eighty-nine Division I Collegiate Athletes was assessed (age 19.84 ± 1.15 yr). Measurements included diet quality, body composition, blood lipid profiling, and wellness factors. Significant deficiencies in Vitamin D (football 6.68 ± 5.84; basketball 4.33 ± 3.17; swim/dive 4 ± 2.97; volleyball 4.07 ± 2.97) and Omega 3-EPA & DHA (football 125.84 ± 301.03; basketball 53.92 ± 48.05; swim/dive 29.45 ± 35.83; volleyball 42.79 ± 30.77), Calcium (swim/dive 1083.55 ± 437.88), and Potassium (swim/dive 1083.55 ± 437.88) were reported. All teams exhibited an energy deficit, however, the highest energy deficit was for football (-843.57 calories). All teams had higher than recommended levels of perceived stress, averaging 20.63, and swim/dive had higher levels of depressive symptoms (6.17 ± 3.30). All teams reported poor sleep quality, averaging 7.20. This assessment indicates variability in dietary quality and wellness factors among individuals and teams. Individualized guidelines should be recommended for those experiencing food intake challenges such as the unique needs of moderate altitude athletes.

(more…)
2019-01-31T14:42:08-05:00February 7th, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Assessing the Dietary Quality and Health Status among Division 1 College Athletes at Moderate Altitude

The Evaluation of Exercise-Induced Hematuria in Endurance Athletes

Authors:
Gregory Marshall, RN, BSN, MSN-S
Devinder Jarial, RN, BSN, MSN-S
Dr. Jessica L. Durbin, DNP, FNP-BC

Corresponding Author:
Devinder Jarial, RN, BSN, MSN-S
8942 Bryant Lane Apartment 1A
Indianapolis, IN 46250
dsjarial@gmail.com
317-213-7904

Gregory Marshall and Devinder Jarial are graduate students at Indiana State University completing their Master of Science in Nursing degrees with a family nurse practitioner concentration. Dr. Jessica Durbin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Advanced Nursing Practice at Indiana State University.

The Evaluation of Exercise-Induced Hematuria in Endurance Athletes

ABSTRACT
Microscopic hematuria can be defined as the presence of greater (>) than 3 red blood cells per milliliter (mL) detected on a high-powered microscopic field, or > 50 red blood cells per mL of urine present on a urine dipstick (14). Exercise-induced hematuria in healthy young adults is not usually associated with significant morbidity or mortality (15). Moderate exercise-induced hematuria is seen habitually, both in athletes and in the general public (14). However, hematuria can be a signal of more serious diseases (15). In endurance athletes, the microscopic hematuria is often self-limiting and resolves within 48-72 hours (1). The abnormal presence of red blood cells in urine may indicate kidney inflammation, infection or trauma in the urinary tract, or neoplastic diseases in the urogenital tract (6). If hematuria doesn’t resolve within 48-72 hours, providers should consider further evaluation. Diagnostics and interventions should be adapted to the individual based on the history of present illness, age, and past medical history. Future research on this topic could be adapted to evaluating and treating microscopic hematuria in multiple sports and activities.
(more…)

2017-12-11T11:35:50-05:00December 14th, 2017|Sports Medicine|Comments Off on The Evaluation of Exercise-Induced Hematuria in Endurance Athletes

The Examination of Sportsmanship Behaviors of Beach Handball Players in Turkey

Authors: Ali Gurel Goksel * (1) Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Faculty of Sports Sciences, Turkey.
Ercan Zorba (2), Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Faculty of Sports Sciences, Turkey.

Corresponding Author:
Ali Gurel Goksel, PhD
Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Faculty of Sports Sciences
Kotekli/Mugla, 48000
aligoksel@mu.edu.tr
002522111951

(1) Ali Gurel Goksel is a research assistant in Sports Exercise Science at the Mugla Sitki Kocman University studying public relations and communications in sports.

(2) Ercan Zorba is assistant professor doctor in Sports Exercise Science at the Mugla Sitki Kocman University studying Olympic philosophy and fair play in sports.

The Examination of Sportsmanship Behaviors of Beach Handball Players in Turkey

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to examine sportsmanship orientation of individuals doing beach handball in terms of some variables. There were 140 athletes, 58 females and 82 males, which participated in the study group that consisted of participants of the Koycegiz Yasar Sevim Universities Beach Handball Tournament. For data collection, the Multidimensional Sportsmanship Orientation Scale, developed by Vallerand, Briere, Blanchard, and Provencher (1997) which was adapted to Turkish by Sezen-Balcikanli (2010), and a personal information form designed by the authors, were used. For the analysis of collected data, frequency analysis was used to determine socio-demographic features of the participant; and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine sportsmanship orientation of beach handball players in terms of different variables. Tukey’s honest significant difference (HSD) test was used for multiple comparisons to find out which group caused the difference. The p < 0.05 significance level was considered in analysis and interpretation of the data. Consequently, statistically significant differences were found in sportsmanship orientation of beach handball players according to age, years of playing handball, and the status of playing on a team. (more…)

2017-07-05T14:14:01-05:00August 10th, 2017|General, Research, Sports Studies and Sports Psychology|Comments Off on The Examination of Sportsmanship Behaviors of Beach Handball Players in Turkey

Your Financial (Life) Game Plan

Authors: Rick Johnston, Frank Messina, Stephanie Yates

Corresponding Author:
Frank Messina, PhD, CPA
1150 10th Avenue South
Birmingham Al, 35294
fmessina@uab.edu
205-934-8827

Rick Johnston is an Associate Professor of Accounting at the UAB Collat School of
Business. His research interests involve capital markets and the creation/use/regulation of
Information. He has published in the Journal of Accounting and Economics, Journal of
Accounting Research, Management Science, and Contemporary Accounting Research.

Frank Messina is the Alumni & Friends Endowed Professor of Accounting at the Collat School of Business, University of Alabama at Birmingham and a Certified Public Accountant. He is also the university’s NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative.

Stephanie Yates is the Director and Endowed Professor for the Regions Institute for Financial Education (RIFE) at UAB. The RIFE focuses on increasing financial literacy in students and adults throughout Alabama and beyond.

Your Financial (Life) Game Plan

ABSTRACT
Athletes face incredible financial uncertainty despite the potential to earn significant incomes. A key unknown is the duration of their playing career. A large body of anecdotal evidence suggests many athletes are financially challenged or bankrupt shortly after their playing career ends. This article explores some of the causes of these financial troubles and highlights some key considerations for athletes to consider to avoid such an outcome.

(more…)

2016-12-12T15:22:41-05:00December 8th, 2016|Sports Management|Comments Off on Your Financial (Life) Game Plan