Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

Authors: Jason C. Casey1, Robert L. Herron2, and Michael R. Esco3

1Department of Kinesiology, University of North Georgia, Oakwood, GA, USA
2Department of Sports Management, United States Sports Academy, Daphne, AL, USA
3Department of Kinesiology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA

Corresponding Author:
Robert L. Herron, MA, CSCS*D, ACSM-RCEP
1 Academy Drive
Daphne Al, 36526
rherron@ussa.edu
251-626-3303

Jason C. Casey, PhD, CSCS*D, EP-C is an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at the University of North Georgia in Oakwood, GA. His research interests focus on fatigue and recovery associated with exercise, athlete monitoring, and sport-related measurement issues.

Robert L. Herron, MA, CSCS*D, ACSM-RECP is currently faculty member and Sport Management doctoral student at the United States Sports Academy.  Robert’s areas of research interest include: measurement and evaluation in sport-related research and recovery from exercise stressors or sport injuries. 

Michael R. Esco, PhD, CSCS*D, FACSM is an associate professor of exercise physiology in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Alabama. His research interests are in the areas of heart rate variability, body composition, athletic monitoring, and cardiovascular physiology.

Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of using BMI-based equations (BEQ) to estimate body-fat percentage (BF%) in female-collegiate gymnasts.  As such, the agreement between BF% estimates with BEQ and air-displacement plethysmography (AP) were compared in twenty-two gymnasts (n = 22).  Body mass, height, and BF% were assessed via AP and BEQ [Jackson et al. (JBMI), Deurenberg et al. (DBMI), and Womersley & Durnin (WBMI)]. Results: The assessments produced the following estimated BF%: AP = 20.3 ± 3.6%; JBMI = 26.9 ± 3.9%; DBMI = 26.4 ± 2.2%; and WBMI = 27.9 ± 2.5%. BF% estimated via AP was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than each BEQ. Weak correlations were found between AP and BEQ (JBMI, r = 0.12; DBMI, r = 0.07; WBMI, r = 0.12). The limits of agreement (constant error ± 1.96 SD) for each BEQ compared to AP were: JBMI = 6.6 ­­± 9.5%; DBMI = 6.1 ­­± 7.8%; and WBMI = 7.6 ± 8.0%. These results suggest a wide range of individual differences existed between BEQ and AP. Furthermore, BEQ significantly overestimated BF% relative to AP in this gymnastics population.  Coaches and sport practitioners are in need of a quick, practical, inexpensive, and accurate method of body composition assessment. Based on this study, BEQ does not meet the needs of the practitioner when compared to AP. As a result, practitioners in the field need to consider other field methods of predicting BF% in collegiate female gymnasts.

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2019-10-28T14:00:06-05:00November 8th, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Comparison of BMI-based equations and plethysmography for estimating body fat in female collegiate gymnasts

Evaluating the Two-Game Road Trip in College Sports: Does a Travel Partner Scheduling Approach Affect Team Competitiveness?

Authors:  Mark Mitchell, Samuel Wathen, and Robert Orwig

Corresponding Author:
Mark Mitchell, DBA
Professor of Marketing
Associate Dean, Wall College of Business
NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR)
Coastal Carolina University
P. O. Box 261954
Conway, SC  29528
mmitchel@coastal.edu
(843) 349-2392

Mark Mitchell, DBA is Professor of Marketing at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, SC.
Samuel Wathen, PhDis Professor of Management at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, SC.
Robert Orwig, DBA is Associate Professor of Management at the University of North Georgia in Dahlonega, GA.

Evaluating the Impact of Two-Game Road Trips in College Sports:  Does a Travel Partner Scheduling Approach Affect Team Competitiveness?

ABSTRACT

Some NCAA athletic conferences have implemented a geographic travel partner strategy when scheduling league games.  Teams are organized into two-team clusters.  A visiting team comes to the region and plays both opponents during one road trip before returning to campus.  Prior research reveals NBA teams tend to have a lower winning percentage when playing back-to-back games on back-to-back evenings.  This study examines the performance of college sports teams on two-game road trips to see if the NBA pattern exists in college sports.  Game results (and winning percentages) from the Sun Belt Conference for the 2016-17 season are evaluated over four sports (women’s soccer, women’s volleyball, women’s basketball, and men’s basketball).  Team performance in Game 2 was comparable to Game 1 in women’s soccer, women’s basketball, and men’s basketball. Game 2 performance was improved in women’s volleyball.   There was not a significant reduction in road team performance in Game 2 of two-game road trips when the quality of the opponent was introduced into the analysis of women’s soccer, women’s volleyball and women’s basketball.  However, men’s basketball teams tended to win more often during Game 1 rather than Game 2 when playing comparable opponents.  The travel partner scheduling model maximizes player rest, reduces travel time, and minimizes missed class time.  This study suggests its implementation does not impact team competitiveness, particularly during Game 2 as found in the NBA.  Conference personnel and university athletic administrators may take comfort that their drive to control costs and enhance the student-athlete experience is not impacting the competitiveness of their teams.

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2019-10-28T09:14:46-05:00November 1st, 2019|Research, Sports Management|Comments Off on Evaluating the Two-Game Road Trip in College Sports: Does a Travel Partner Scheduling Approach Affect Team Competitiveness?

Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

Authors: Shemeika McCray & Joni M. Boyd, PhD. CSCS*D

Corresponding Author:
Joni M. Boyd, PhD, CSCS*D
216L West Center
Rock Hill, SC 29732
boydj@winthrop.edu
803-323-4936

Shemeika McCray is an undergraduate student in the Exercise Science Program at Winthrop University.  Dr. Joni Boyd is an Associate Professor of Exercise Science and Coaching at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC.

Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of dry needling within NCAA Division I athletes for muscle performance and/or recovery.Seventy-seven NCAA Division I Athletes completed an 15-item online survey sent via e-mail, which included demographics, exposure to dry needling, and perceptions of effectiveness. Those that had no experience of dry needling were asked to rate their perceptions and reasoning for non-exposure. The results indicated that 66% (n=51) of participants did not have experience with dry needling, while 34% (n=26) did have experience with dry needling. Athletes that experienced dry needling reported that dry needling was effective and comfortable for efficient and speedy recovery. They also reported that they would recommend others to use this recovery treatment.  Those athletes with non-exposure to dry needling reported that they would rather use other treatments, concerned with pain or bruising from dry needling or was not sure it would work for recovery.  These results help to fill current gaps in research on dry needling.  Future research could compare treatment protocols for pain management and/or recovery effectiveness.

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2019-10-21T15:46:38-05:00October 21st, 2019|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

Does Public Interest in Specific Injuries Increase When They Occur During Mixed Martial Arts Bouts? A Study of Google Search Patterns

Authors: William B. Roberts, MS; Michael E. Bibens BS; Matt Vassar, PhD.

Institution:Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, Dept. of Institutional Research

Institution Address: 1111 West 17th Street, Tulsa, OK, 74107

Corresponding Author: William Roberts; 1111 West 17th Street, Tulsa, OK, 74107; will.roberts10@okstate.edu

Conflicts of Interest: The authors have nothing to disclose.

Does Public Interest in Specific Injuries Increase When They Occur During Mixed Martial Arts Bouts? A Study of Google Search Patterns

ABSTRACT:

Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a combat sport that combines fighting techniques from many disciplines, such as wrestling, boxing, karate, Muay Thai, and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Despite this sport’s popularity –  influenced by the internet and social media –  the effect of high-profile MMA injuries on the public’s subsequent online search patterns has yet to be explored. In this study, we examined injuries from popular UFC bouts and observe whether the volume of Google searches for specific injuries increased after the associated fights. Google Trend (GT) searches were conducted in order to evaluate the relationship between fighter search popularity and injury search popularity during the week the fight took place. The percent change in search interest for injuries increased in 9 of 10 cases (Mdn = 446%, IQR: 168.75%-1643.75%). The findings of this study are expected to inform sports medicine personnel regarding specific platforms for sharing their insights and recommendations for the treatment and prevention of MMA injuries and other trauma-related injuries. This study highlights how investigation of public search interest may ultimately have a positive impact on health care outcomes.  Through the use of analyzing MMA injuries and the search patterns associated with them, the results of this study may aid sports medicine personnel in directing patients to online information that they have personally reviewed and approved.

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2019-09-05T08:45:30-05:00August 15th, 2019|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Does Public Interest in Specific Injuries Increase When They Occur During Mixed Martial Arts Bouts? A Study of Google Search Patterns

Physical performance of youth football (soccer) players playing in European and National Leagues’ matches

Authors: Emmanouil Smpokos, Antonios Tsikakis, Ricardo Peres, Vangelis Lappas, Pedro Caravela,  Paulo Oliveira, Manolis Linardakis  and the ‘Olympiacos FC Academy Research Group’

Corresponding Author:
Emmanouil Smpokos
E-mail: msbokos@edu.med.uoc.gr or manosmpok@yahoo.gr (Dr. E. Sbokos)
Phone number: 0030 6945233315
Fax number: 0030 2155308859

Emmanouil Smpokos, PhD/MSc, is the senior physiologist at the Research and Development Department, Olympiacos Academy Football Club, Piraeus, Greece and fitness coach of the U-19; Antonios Tsikakis is the fitness coach at the Department in U-17 ; Ricardo Peres is the Technical Director and the Head coach of the U-19 of Olympiacos FC Academy ; Vangelis Lappas is the head of Goalkeepers’ Department and the Goalkeeper coach of the U-19 team of Olympiacos FC Academy; Pedro Caravela is the Head of the Scouting Department and assistant coach of U-19 team of Olympiacos FC Academy; Paulo Oliveira is assistant coach of Olympiacos FC Academy ; Manolis Linardakis, PhD/MSc, is Biostatistician at Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.  

Physical performance of youth football (soccer) players playing in European and National Leagues’ matches

ABSTRACT

The current study assessed the physical performance of youth Greek football (soccer) players between the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Youth and National Leagues’ matches. This effort was based on 271 measurements of nine physical/motor activities recruited from 25 players with a mean age of 18.4 (±1.2 years) during August 2017 and January 2018 from official-matches of UEFA Youth (n=6) and National Leagues (n=16). Measurements were recruited using Global-Positioning-System Technology-(GPS) and differences were assessed through analysis of covariance. 56.0% of the players were 18.0+ years old, 52.0% were midfielders, and 56.5% of players’ participations were recorded in full time (90.0+ minutes). Between the two competitions of UEFA Youth and National Leagues’ matches, it has been found that there is significant difference only in mean number of decelerations (71.4 vs. 61.7, respectively, p=0.010). High mean levels of total distance-(TD), very high-intensity-speed-running-distance-(VHS), maximal-sprinting-speed-distance-(MS), high-speed-running-(HSR), distance/time-(D/T), sprints, number of accelerations and maximum-velocity-(Vmax) were noticed as well as in UEFA Youth Leagues’ matches but did not differed significantly in relation to counterparts (p>0.05). The researchers observed that youth football players displayed similar efforts in all matches maintaining a high level of physical performance, without separating the matches according to the competition, due to the educational behavior adopted within the football academy of the club.

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2019-07-24T09:03:50-05:00August 1st, 2019|Research, Sports Health & Fitness|Comments Off on Physical performance of youth football (soccer) players playing in European and National Leagues’ matches