Evaluating the Two-Game Road Trip in College Sports: Does a Travel Partner Scheduling Approach Affect Team Competitiveness?

Authors:  Mark Mitchell, Samuel Wathen, and Robert Orwig

Corresponding Author:
Mark Mitchell, DBA
Professor of Marketing
Associate Dean, Wall College of Business
NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR)
Coastal Carolina University
P. O. Box 261954
Conway, SC  29528
mmitchel@coastal.edu
(843) 349-2392

Mark Mitchell, DBA is Professor of Marketing at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, SC.
Samuel Wathen, PhDis Professor of Management at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, SC.
Robert Orwig, DBA is Associate Professor of Management at the University of North Georgia in Dahlonega, GA.

Evaluating the Impact of Two-Game Road Trips in College Sports:  Does a Travel Partner Scheduling Approach Affect Team Competitiveness?

ABSTRACT

Some NCAA athletic conferences have implemented a geographic travel partner strategy when scheduling league games.  Teams are organized into two-team clusters.  A visiting team comes to the region and plays both opponents during one road trip before returning to campus.  Prior research reveals NBA teams tend to have a lower winning percentage when playing back-to-back games on back-to-back evenings.  This study examines the performance of college sports teams on two-game road trips to see if the NBA pattern exists in college sports.  Game results (and winning percentages) from the Sun Belt Conference for the 2016-17 season are evaluated over four sports (women’s soccer, women’s volleyball, women’s basketball, and men’s basketball).  Team performance in Game 2 was comparable to Game 1 in women’s soccer, women’s basketball, and men’s basketball. Game 2 performance was improved in women’s volleyball.   There was not a significant reduction in road team performance in Game 2 of two-game road trips when the quality of the opponent was introduced into the analysis of women’s soccer, women’s volleyball and women’s basketball.  However, men’s basketball teams tended to win more often during Game 1 rather than Game 2 when playing comparable opponents.  The travel partner scheduling model maximizes player rest, reduces travel time, and minimizes missed class time.  This study suggests its implementation does not impact team competitiveness, particularly during Game 2 as found in the NBA.  Conference personnel and university athletic administrators may take comfort that their drive to control costs and enhance the student-athlete experience is not impacting the competitiveness of their teams.

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2019-10-28T09:14:46-05:00November 1st, 2019|Research, Sports Management|Comments Off on Evaluating the Two-Game Road Trip in College Sports: Does a Travel Partner Scheduling Approach Affect Team Competitiveness?

Aggressive Osteoblastoma of the Acetabulum in an 18-Year-Old Female Volleyball Player

Author: Tayleigh Talmadge MAT, ATC

Corresponding Author:
Valerie Moody PhD, LAT, ATC
32 Campus Dr. McGill 205
HHP Department
Missoula, MT 59812
406-243-2703 (office)
valerie.moody@umontana.edu

Tayleigh Talmadge is a recent graduate of the Masters in Athletic Training Program at the University of Montana. Valerie Moody is a Professor and Program Director of the Athletic Training Program at the University of Montana.

Aggressive Osteoblastoma of the Acetabulum in an 18-Year-Old Female Volleyball Player

Abstract

In a case study, an 18-year-old female volleyball player presented with persistent hip pain. Imaging revealed a lesion in the acetabulum and follow up biopsies led to the diagnosis of a benign osteoblastoma. The patient underwent a surgical resection and open reduction internal fixation of the acetabulum. Aggressive osteoblastomas of the acetabulum are rare in a young, active population; therefore, clinicians must be able to recognize the need to refer for further evaluation and understand the importance of a multidisciplinary individualized plan of care to ensure a successful return to play for the patient.

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2019-10-28T13:20:58-05:00October 25th, 2019|Contemporary Sports Issues, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Aggressive Osteoblastoma of the Acetabulum in an 18-Year-Old Female Volleyball Player

Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

Authors: Shemeika McCray & Joni M. Boyd, PhD. CSCS*D

Corresponding Author:
Joni M. Boyd, PhD, CSCS*D
216L West Center
Rock Hill, SC 29732
boydj@winthrop.edu
803-323-4936

Shemeika McCray is an undergraduate student in the Exercise Science Program at Winthrop University.  Dr. Joni Boyd is an Associate Professor of Exercise Science and Coaching at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC.

Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of dry needling within NCAA Division I athletes for muscle performance and/or recovery.Seventy-seven NCAA Division I Athletes completed an 15-item online survey sent via e-mail, which included demographics, exposure to dry needling, and perceptions of effectiveness. Those that had no experience of dry needling were asked to rate their perceptions and reasoning for non-exposure. The results indicated that 66% (n=51) of participants did not have experience with dry needling, while 34% (n=26) did have experience with dry needling. Athletes that experienced dry needling reported that dry needling was effective and comfortable for efficient and speedy recovery. They also reported that they would recommend others to use this recovery treatment.  Those athletes with non-exposure to dry needling reported that they would rather use other treatments, concerned with pain or bruising from dry needling or was not sure it would work for recovery.  These results help to fill current gaps in research on dry needling.  Future research could compare treatment protocols for pain management and/or recovery effectiveness.

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2019-10-21T15:46:38-05:00October 21st, 2019|Research, Sports Medicine|Comments Off on Perceptions of Dry Needling for Performance & Recovery in NCAA Division I Athletes

How Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Can Benefit From E-Sports While Adding Diversity into the Gaming Industry

Authors: David C. Hughes & Dr. W. Timothy Orr

Corresponding Author:
Hughes, David C; Dr. Orr, Timothy, W;
134 Holland Hall Hampton University
Hampton, VA, 23668
David.hughes@hamptonu.edu
832-425-4484

David C. Hughes
Hampton University

Dr. W. Timothy Orr
Hampton University

David C. Hughes sits on the board of Directors for the Drake Group, is a Capstone Advisor at Georgetown University, and serves as an Instructor of Sport Management at Hampton University. Dr. W. Timothy Orr is a former collegiate coach, athletic director, and student athlete. Dr. Orr currently serves as the Program Coordinator for the Masters of Sport Management at Hampton University.

How Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Can Benefit From E-Sports While Adding Diversity into the Gaming Industry

ABSTRACT

Dr. Shaun R. Harper infamously came to the conclusion that “Perhaps nowhere in higher education is the disenfranchisement of Black male students more insidious than in college athletics” (7). This quote is not attributed to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), but to the power five conferences of Predominately White Institutions (PWIs). As of 2019, Black E-Sport coaches make up less than 2% of coaches at PWIs (20). Professional gaming or better known as E-Sports is not only a billion dollar industry (17), but has allowed for over $15 million dollars in collegiate scholarships to be awarded for the 2016-2019 school year (20). Yet, no Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have started an E-Sports team. HBCUs are excluding themselves from a billion dollar industry, while also failing to increase the diversity of E-Sports participators, coaches at PWIs and HBCUs, and Black professional gamers.  This paper has practical application as it provides convincing evidence as to why HBCUs could not only benefit from investing in E-Sports, but can help the professional gaming industry with its diversity issue.

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2019-10-10T15:08:54-05:00October 11th, 2019|Commentary, Sports Management|Comments Off on How Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Can Benefit From E-Sports While Adding Diversity into the Gaming Industry

Examination of Athletic Best Performance Trends in Track and Field Over One Hundred Years’ History

Authors: Ran Wei and Yuanlong Liu

Corresponding author:
Ran Wei, MA
Western Michigan University
1903 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo, MI, USA 49008-5426
Campus Site: Room 4024-4 Student Recreation Center
Phone: (269) 267-2493
Fax: (269) 387-2704
Email: ran.wei@wmich.edu

Ran Wei is a doctoral student in the PhD-EHD program of College of Education and Human Development. Her emphasis area is Sport Management in the department of Human Performance and Health Education. Dr. Yuanlong Liu is a professor and chair of the department of Human Performance and Health Education. His specialty is evaluation and measurement in Kinesiology. He serves as editor and associate editor among multiple journals.

Examination of Athletic Best Performance Trends in Track and Field Over One Hundred Years’ History

ABSTRACT

It is always interesting to predict future performance and explore human limits. In this study, 24 events (running, jumping, and throwing) were studied from men’s and women’s track and field events. The best yearly performance data and world record data since 1900 to 2018 were collected. All the events were analyzed by applying longitudinal analysis with scatterplots. The findings revealed that it is encouraging to expect the new world record in men’s shorter running events and women’s longer running events. However, the waiting time for the new world records in men’s longer running events, women’s shorter running events, and both their field events will be much longer as going into the 21st century. For the overall track and field events, both men’s and women’s athletic performance may have reached the asymptotic level. Women’s athletic performances will not surpass men’s performances in track and field in the near future. To explore track and field performance trends and predict future world records, research of new methods and new prediction models are needed when the asymptotic level has been reached.

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2019-09-05T15:10:45-05:00September 5th, 2019|Commentary, Sports History|Comments Off on Examination of Athletic Best Performance Trends in Track and Field Over One Hundred Years’ History